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Full text of "Sacred songs for public worship : a hymn and tune book"

FROM THE LIBRARY OF 



REV. LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON, D. D. 



BEQUEATHED BY HIM TO 



THE LIBRARY OF 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



m^^dom 2 ^ S 
Srctloa (pl I I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Princeton Theological Seminary Library 



http://archive.org/details/saforpuOOsava 



/ 



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'V 



SACRED SONGS FOR PUBLIC WORSHIP.,;^ 



a f^mn and Cime laoofe 



EDITED BY 



M. J. SAVAGE AXD HOWARD M. DOW 



BOSTOX 
GEO. H. ELLIS, 141 FRANKLIN STREET 

18S3 



Copyright, 1883, 
By GEORGE H. ELLIS, 



PREFACE 



So MANY Hymn and Tune Books are already before the public that 
perhaps one may be fairly expected to apologize for adding another to 
the growing list. The editor's original intention, as in the case of his 
Hand Book, was simply to prepare something for his own personal use. 
But this second venture, like the first, has grown beyond the original 
purpose. Under the urgency of the Standing Committee of his own 
church, and of representatives of other churches, who thought they also 
might care to use it, the editor has gone on to the completion of what 
is now offered to the public. 

If anybody, besides the editor, shall care to adopt it, it must be 
because they are in substantial agreement with him as to what is desir- 
able in a collection of hymns and tunes for the ordinary uses of Sunday 
worship. It is fitting then that he should briefly indicate the principles 
by which he has been guided. 

1. It was determined that the book should be small. In eight 
years' ministry with the Church of the Unity, it was found that less 
than sixty hymns of the American Unitarian Association collection had 
been used. There seemed no adequate reason for continuing to pick 
those less than sixty out of a collection of eight hundred. 

2. The editor desired, for his own use, hymns touching on some 
new topics, and many old topics in new ways, such as he did not fi^nd 
in any one previous collection. He has attempted to meet this want by 
selections from many various sources, and by considerable original con- 
tributions of his own. He does not claim any complete success in this 



PREFACE 

direction ; nor does he mean to set up his book as a standard by which 
others are to be criticised or condemned. He does hope, however, to 
supply his own want better in this way. 

3. As to music, it was determined that every tune should be 
familiar. Whatever may be possible in some cases, it is generally found 
to be impracticable to get congregations to practise and learn new 
music. But, however often it is sung, people will always greet a familiar 
tune with all the enthusiasm of old acquaintance. They thus join 
heartily in the service. And so the one end of congregational singing 
is attained. Enough variety may always be secured through the contri- 
butions of the choir. 

The test of familiarity, then, has been rigidly applied, with the 
exception of a few original pieces written to accompany some special 
original songs. 

4. It was found that a topical arrangement of the hymns would 
necessitate their separation from the tunes with which it was thought 
best to wed them. It was determined, therefore, that convenience for 
singing should take precedence. The order of the hymns then has been 
determined by the music ; and so, in every case, the hymn and its tune 
will be found at the same opening. 

But the topical index of first lines will make it very easy to find any 
hymn, on any subject, that the book contains. 

5. The editor was urged, by some advisers, to include in his book 
some forms of congregational service. But it is his opinion that these, 
when desired, may be as conveniently comprised in a volume by them- 
selves. 

6. It seems desirable that a word should be said concerning the 
doctrinal implications of hymns. It is said that, on a certain occasion, 
Dr. Bellows was with an English gentleman at a service in King's 
Chapel. After looking over the revised Service Book, the Englishman, 
turning to the doctor, remarked, "Ah, I see you Unitarians use the 



PREFACE 

Prayer Book, diluted^ Dr. Bellows replied, ''Oh, no! not diluted; 
washed I '' 

The editor ventures to suggest that our Unitarian Hymn Books 
have not usually been washed enough. He would also say, in all 
humility, that, in making up this book, he has tried to be always mindful 
of an ancient command, apparently many times overlooked, — '* Thoii 
shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve!' With 
all his reverence for Jesus, he cannot think that either good logic or true 
piety can permit a consistent Unitarian to offer to the Man of Nazareth 
that worship — either prayer or hymn — which he himself always taught 
his disciples, both by precept and example, should be given to God alone. 

7. If any one should think that the editor has included too large 
a proportion of his own composition, he stands ready with a threefold 
reply : — 

(i) He pleads guilty. 

(2) He suggests his original intention, — to make a book merely for 
his own use. 

(3) He would remind the objector that enough for all practical 
purposes may be found, though all of his own composition are passed by. 

M. J. S. 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

I. Index of Subjects, vii ix 

II. Classified Index, . x-xii 

III. Index of First Lines, xiii-xv 

IV. Index to Tunes, xvi 

V. Index to Metres, . xvii 

VI. Index of Authors, xviii 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



KO. HYMN 

A 

Advancing God, The 6 

Age-long Battle, The 149 

All as God wills 77 

All equal before God 51 

All Truth leads to God 97 

American Song, The 195 

Another Day 12 

Another Year 98 

Aspiration 105 

Assured 101 

Auld Lang Syne 81 



Battle 159 

Beauty for Ashes 131 

Beauty of the World, The 42 

Be True to Yourself 54 

Better Land, The 39 

Blessed are they that mourn 38 

Blessed are they that mouru 96 

Book of Nature, The 64 

Breathing after Holiness 61 

Brotherhood 118 

Builders, The 125 



KO. HYMN 

Consecration of Children 30 

Consider the Lilies 165 

Creed, A 154 



Death of the Righteous 95 

Decoration Day 138 

Dedication 52 

Dedication of a Church 168 

Devotion to God 19 

Divine Help 57 

Divine Love 150 

Divine Will, The 74 

Doxology 43 

Doxology 44 

Duty 127 



Easter Song 138 

Education 126 

Effort 73 

Eternal Lights, The 122 

Eternity of God 16 

Evening 166 

Ever with Me 176 

Evolution 102 



^ „ ^ ^, . ,,^ Faith above Creed 

Call of the Age If? ' Father of All, The 

Cnnstmas o3 ^^r Divine Strength 1S4 

Christmas Carol 189 *^ 



4 

161 



G 



Christmas Carol 192 

Christmas Hymn 191 

Christmas Song 190 Gentle Teacher, The 137 

Church Universal, The 76 Give ns our Daily Bread 123 

City of God, The 71 God ever Xear 18 

City of God, The 139 ■ God Incomprehensible 9 

Clouds 68 God is Good 7 

Coming of God's Kingdom 15G God is Love 136 

Conflict of Life, The 140 God our Shepherd 183 

Consecration 109 God's Anvil "^ 

(vii) 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS 



NO. HYMN 

God save the State 179 

God with Us 8 

Good-night 167 

Greeting 27 

H 

Happy New Year ." 121 

Harvest Call, The 34 

Harvest Song, A 2 

Heaven 35 

Heaven Everywhere 112 

He careth for Us 147 

Heredity 123 

Heroic Memories 85 

Hope 103 

Hope above Doubt 148 

Hope of Man, The 22 

House of God, The 14 

House our Fathers built to God, The 59 

Hymn of Autumn 1 

Hymn of Spring 72 

Hymn of Summer 69 



In Calm and Storm 110 

In Common Things 124 

Independent and Happy Life, An 23 

Indwelling God, The 79 

Inspiration 130 

It is nigh thee, in thy Heart 117 

I will sing of thy Power and thy Mercy ... 91 



Jerusalem the Golden 175 

Jesus of Nazareth 93 



K 

Kindly Judgment 90 



Law of Love, The 47 

Laying a Comer-stone of a Church 108 

Leading the Way 94 

Life's ^Meaning 29 

Life's Work 142 

Light for All 164 

Listening 66 

Lord is in his Holy Temple, The 158 

Lord shall lead me, The 115 

Lord's Prayer, The 113 

Love, 160 

Love of God, The 28 



M 



NO. HYMN 



Man Frail, and God Eternal 106 

Manifold Grace of God, The 104 

Mother's Hymn, The 25 

N 

National Hymn 178 

National Hymn 193 

Natural Religion 10 

Nature's Worship 86 

Nearer, my God, to Thee 177 

New Year, A 89 

Not Afar Off 31 



Offering, The 134 

One by One 143 

One Fold and One Shepherd 169 

On the Field 60 

On the Lord's Side 53 

On the Watch-Tower 133 

Opening Year, The 46 

Ordaining a Minister 5 

Organizing a Church 3 



Parting here. The Greeting there, The .... 37 

Pilgrim Fathers, The 120 

Praise 45 

Prayer 80 

Prayer 181 

Prayer for Faith, A 21 

Prayer for Peace 194 

Presence, The 11 

Psalm of Life 141 

Pure Worship 70 

Purpose in Life, A 155 

Q 

Quiet Religion 174 



R 

Race of Life, The 49 

Receptivity 50 

Rest 180 

Religious Resolves 17 

Retirement and Meditation 13 

Righteous Blessed in Death, The 41 

Right is the Beautiful, The 114 

Rise, my Soul 173 

S 

Sacrifice of the Heart, The 15 

Safety in God 170 

Seed, The 40 



(viii) 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS 



NO. HYMN 

Seeking God 135 

Serving Man 84 

Social Love 132 

So Far, so Near 5G 

Song of Faith, A 58 

Song of the Silent Ones 82 

Song of Trust, A 67 

Sower, The Ill 

Speak Gently C2 

Spring 100 

Step by Step 145 

Struggle 129 

Summer Days 83 

Surrounding the Mercy-seat 157 

Stream of Faith, The 05 



Thankful Heart, A 92 

Thy Kingdom come 99 

Thy Kingdom come 116 

To Truth 171 

True Fast, The 119 

True Length of Life 36 

Trust and Wait 172 



Verj' Near 

Vesper Hymn .... 
Voice of the Past, The 



33 

26 

187 



w 

Waiting for Death . . 151 

Waiting God, The 55 

Walk in the Light 88 

Ways of Wisdom, The 107 

AVho by searching can find out God 185 

Who is thy Neighbor 87 

Why seek ye the Living among the Dead ... 32 

Winter 24 

Wisdom and Virtue sought from God .... 29 

Word of the Lord abideth forever. The ... 152 

Work 144 

Work, for the Night is coming 162 

Working with God , 48 

Worship 63 



u 

Undying Things, The 182 | Yet speaketh 

Universal Prayer, The 63 i 

(ix) 



78 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 



{Arranged by First Lines.) 
I. LIFE. 



NO. HYMN KO. HYMN 

Abide not in the realm of dreams , 34 Oh, blest is he to whom is given 60 

All are architects of Fate 125 ' Oh, not in far-off realms of space 79 

All around us, fair with flowers 142 i Oh, sometimes comes to soul and sense ... 33 

All men are equal in their birth 51 I One by one the sands are flowing 143 

Awake, my soul ; stretch every nerve .... 49 { Onward, onward though the region 140 

{ Ope, ope, my soul! around thee press .... 50 

Be true to every inmost thought 54 ; O Star of Truth, down shining 171 

Our heaven is everywhere 112 



Comrades, hark! the air about us 187 



Rise, my soul, and stretch thy wings 



173 



Dost thou hear the bugle sounding .... 
From heart to heart, from creed to creed . . 
God's trumpet wakes the slumbering world . 



159 1 



65 



53 



Heir of all the ages, 1 123 

He liveth long who liveth well 29 

How happy is he, bom or taught 23 

Hush the loud cannon's roar 118 



I ask not wealth, but power to take 21 

I believe in human kindness 154 

If , on a quiet sea 110 

Immortal by their deed and word 78 

In each breeze that wanders free 124 



Say not the law divine 117 

Scorn not the slightest word or deed .... 73 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot 81 

Speakgently,— it is better far 62 

I Tell me not in mournful numbers 141 

I The dove let loose in eastern skies 105 

i The light pours down from heaven 164 

The loving Friend to all who bowed 93 

I The one life thrilled the star dust through . . 102 

The past is dark with sin and shame 22 

There's a strife we all must wage 129 

The waves unbuild the wasting shore .... 4 

They call the world a dreary place 42 

Think gently of the erring one 90 

Thou whose name is blazoned forth 127 



Kind words can never die 182 



"Walk in the light I so shalt thou know .... 88 

We are living, we are dwelling 146 

When the truth shall lead us home 132 

I Who is thy neighbor? He whom thou .... 87 

Learners are we all at school 126 Wisdom has treasures greater far 107 

Like shadows gliding o'er the plain 36 Work I for the night is coming 162 

Live for something! be not idle 155 Work, it is thy highest mission 144 

I Workman of God, oh! lose not heart .... 4S 



Make channels for the streams of love 
May I resolve with all my heart . . . 



47 

17 Yes, for me, for me He careth 

(X) 



147 



CLASSIFIED INDEX 



11. SORROW AXD HOPE. 



KO. HYSLN 

Ah! why Should bitter tears be Shed 32 

All as God wills ! who wisely heeds 77 

A lowering sky with heavy clouds 68 

Another hand is beckoning us 94 

Behold the western evening light 95 

Day by day the manna fell 128 

Deem not that they are blest alone 38 

Ever find I joy in reading 137 

From lips divine, like healing balm 96 

God giveth quietness at last , . 37 | 

How blessed the righteous when he dies ... 41 

I breathe the fiery furnace breath 75 

I long for household voices gone 101 



NO. HYMN 

It singeth low in every heart 82 

Jerusalem, the golden 175 

Leaf by leaf the roses fail 131 

Misfortune's hand hangs o'er me 172 

Not so fearful, doubting pilgrim 145 

Only waiting till the shadows 151 

Standing upon the mountain-top 103 

There is a land mine eye hath seen 39 

We'll sing our loving trust in God 85 

What is that goal of human hope 35 

When the burdens on us press 194 

When the gladsome day declineth 148 



III. TIMES. 



Again, as evening shadow falls . 
Another year of setting suns . . 

Backward looking o'er the past . 
Bom at last ! the great Messiah 



God bless our native land 

Good night, we say at parting . . . 
Great God, we sing that mighty hand 



He hides within the lily 

How glad the tone when summer's sun .... 

In the horror of the darkness of the old primeval 

night 

In the old time, runs the story 

Is this a fast for me 

Let the heavens break forth in singing . . 

My country, 'tis of thee 



26 



121 

190 

179 
167 

46 

165 
69 



188 
189 
119 

191 



O thou whose own vast temple stands 
Our fathers' God, who still .... 
Our Father, through the coming year 



52 
193 

89 



Slowly by God's hand unfurled 122 

Sow in the morn thy seed 111 

The breaking waves dashed high 120 

The cattle on a thousand hills 84 

The harp at nature's advent strung 86 

There is a book who runs may read 64 

The shadows fall so gently 166 

The softened mould is brown and warm . . . 100 

The summer days are come again 83 

The very blossoms of our life 30 

'Tis winter now ; the fallen snow 24 

Upon one land alone 181 



I Up the pathway of the ages 149 

' ° i 

Now is the seed-time; God alone 40 Watchman, tell us of the night 133 

Now is the time approaching 169 ^e love the venerable house 59 

Now the joyful Christmas morning 153 ^^^e remeral)er thee, O brave ones 138 

What purpose bums within our hearts .... 3 

O God, the stars of splendor 168 ] What song shall .America sing 185 

O Life that maketh all things new 27 When as returns this solemn day 15 

O Lord of seasons, unto thee 1 When up to nightly skies we gaze 31 

Once more the liberal year laughs out .... 2 When warmer suns and bluer skies 72 

O shepherds, shepherds, did you hear .... 192 . Who is he fit to teach and guide 5 

(xi) 



CLASSIFIED INDEX 



lY. WORSHIP. 



NO. HYMN 

Assist US, Lord, to act, to be 20 

Be thou, O God, exalted high 44 

City of God, how broad and far 71 

Come, kingdom of our God 116 



Ere mountains reared their forms sublime 



16 



Far from mortal cares retreating 157 

Father, by whatsoever light 97 

Father, in thy mysterious presence kneeling . 184 

Father of all ! in every age 63 

Father, we would not dare to change .... 80 

Father, whate'er of earthly bliss 92 

From all that dwell below the skies 45 

Glorious things of thee are spoken 139 

God is in his holy temple 158 

God is love: his mercy brightens 136 

God is my strong salvation 170 

God of ages and of nations 152 

Great God, in vain man's narrow view .... 9 

Here on this little world 181 

How shall come thy kingdom holy 156 

I cannot find thee. Still on restless pinion . . 185 

I hear it often in the dark 66 

In darker days and nights of storm 6 

I worship thee, sweet will of God 74 

Life of ages, richly poured 130 

Like travellers that stray 180 

Lo, God is here! let us adore 14 

Lord, what offering shall we bring 134 

Lord, who ordainest for mankind 25 

Love divine, all love excelling 150 



NO. HYMN 

My God, permit me not to be 13 

My gracious God, I own thy right 19 

Mysterious Presence, Source of all 11 

Nearer, my God, to thee 177 

Now, as the parting hour is nigh 43 

O God, I thank thee for each sight 12 

O God, our help in ages past 106 

O God, the darkness roll away 99 

O God, whose law is in the sky 109 

O God, whose presence glows in all 8 

Oh, that the Lord would guide my ways ... 61 

O Love divine, of all that is 67 

O Love, with thy sweet chains 160 

O name all other names above 57 

One holy church of God appears 76 

Open, Lord, my inward ear 174 

O Source divine and Life of all 28 

O Thou in all thy might so far 56 

Our Father, God, thy gracious power .... 91 

Our God is good: in earth and sky 7 

Our heavenly Father, hear 113 

Teach me, my God and King 114 

Teach us. Father, how to find thee 135 

The heavens cannot contain thee, Lord . . , 108 

The Lord is in his holy temple 186 

The Lord is my shepherd: no want shall I know 183 

The offerings to thy throne which rise .... 70 

Thou art with me, O my Father 176 

Thou Grace divine, encircling all 104 

Thou long disowned, reviled, oppressed ... 55 

Thy way, not mine, O Lord 115 

We pray no more, made lowly wise 58 

What secret place, what distant star .... 18 

When on some strain of music 163 

Where ancient forests widely spread .... 10 



(xii) 



INDEX OF FIRST LINES. 



A. 

Abide not in the realm of dreams 34 

Again, as evening's shadow falls 26 

Ah! why should bitter tears be shed 32 

All are architects of fate 125 

All around us, fair with flowers 142 

All as God wills ! who wisely heeds 77 

All men are equal in their birth 51 

A lowering sky with heavy clouds 68 

Another hand is beckoning us 94 

Another year of setting suns 98 

Assist us, Lord, to act, to be 20 

Awake, my soul; stretch every nerve .... 49 

B. 

Backward looking o'er the past 121 

Behold the western evening light 95 

Be thou, O God, exalted high 44 

Be true to every inmost thought 54 

Born at last the great Messiah 190 



City of God, how broad and far 71 

Come, kingdom of our God 116 

Comrades, hark ! the air about us 187 

D. 

Day by day the manna fell 128 

Deem not that they are blessed alone .... 38 

Dost thou hear the bugle sounding 159 

E. 

Ere mountains reared their forms sublime . . 16 

Ever find I joy in reading 13' 



PAGE 

Father of all! in every age 63 

Father, we would not dare to change .... 80 

Father, whate'er of earthly bliss 92 

From all that dwell below the skies 45 

From heart to heart, from creed to creed ... 65 

From lips divine, like healing balm 96 

G. 

Glorious things of thee are spoken 139 

God bless our native land 179 

God giveth quietness at last 37 

God is in his holy temple 158 

God is love : his mercy brightens 136 

God is my strong salvation 170 

God of ages and of nations 152 

God's trumpet wakes the slumbering world . . 53 

Good-night, we say at parting 167 

Great God, in vain man's narrow view .... 9 

Great God, we sing that mighty hand .... 46 

H. 

He hides within the lily 165 

Heir of all the ages, I . . . . ; 123 

He liveth long who liveth well 29 

Here on this little world 181 

How blessed the righteous when he dies ... 41 

How glad the tone when summer's sun . . . . 63 

How happy is he, bom or taught 23 

How shall come thy kingdom holy 156 

Hush the loud cannon's roar 118 



I. 



F. 



I ask not wealth, but power to take 21 

I believe in human kindness 154 

I I breathe the fiery furnace breath 75 

I I cannot find Thee : still, on restless pinion . . 185 

I I hear it often in the dark 66 

Far from mortal cares retreating 157 I long for household voices gone 101 

Father, by whatsoever light 97 I worship thee, sweet will of God 74 

Father, in thy mysterious presence kneeling . 184 If , on a quiet sea 11^) 

(xiii) 



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 



PAGE 

Immortal by their deed and word 78 

In darker days and nights of storm 6 

In each breeze that wanders free 124 

In the horror of the darkness of the old prime- 
val night 188 

In the old time, runs the story 189 

Is this a fast for me? . 119 

It singeth low in every heart 82 



Jerusalem the golden 175 



K. 

Kind words can never die . 



182 



L. 

Leaf by leaf the roses fall 131 

Learners are we all at school 126 

Let the heavens break forth in singing .... 191 

Life of ages, riclily poured 130 

Like shadows gliding o'er the plain 36 

Like travellers that stray 180 

Live for something ! be not idle 155 

Lo, God is here ! let us adore 14 

Lord, what offering shall we bring 134 

Lord, who ordainest for mankind 25 

Love divine, all love excelling 150 



M. 

Make channels for the streams of love .... 47 

3Iay I resolve with all my heart 17 

Misfortune's hand hangs o'er me 172 

My country, 'tis of thee 178 

My God, permit me not to be 13 

My gracious God, I own thy right 19 

Mysterious Presence, Source of all 11 



N. 

Nearer, my God, to thee 177 

Not so fearful, doubting pilgrim 145 

Now, as the parting hour is nigh 43 

Now is the seed-time ; God alone 40 

Now is the time approaching 169 

Now the joyful Christmas morning 153 



0. 

O God, I thank thee for each sight 12 

O God, our help in ages past 106 

O God, the darkness roll away 99 

O God, the stars of splendor 168 

O God, whose law is in the sky 109 

O God, whose presence glows in all 8 



PAGE 

Oh, blest is he to whom is given 60 

Oh, not in far-off realms of space 79 

Oh, sometimes comes to soul and sense .... 33 

Oh, that the Lord would guide my ways ... 61 

O Life that maketh all things new 27 

O Lord of seasons ! unto thee 1 

O Love divine, of all that is 67 

O Love, with thy sweet chains 160 

O name all other names above 57 

Once more the liberal year laughs out .... 2 

One by one, the sands are flowing 143 

One holy Church of God appears 76 

Only waiting till the shadows 151 

Onward, onward, though the region 140 

Open, Lord, my inward ear 174 

Ope, ope, my soul! Around thee press . ... 50 

O shepherds, shepherds, did you hear .... 192 

O Source divine, and Life of all 28 

O Star of Truth, down shining 171 

O Thou, in all thy might so far 56 

O Thou, whose own vast temple stands .... 52 

Our fathers' God, who still 193 

Our Father, God ! thy gracious power .... 91 

Our Father, through the coming year .... 89 

Our God is good: in earth and sky 7 

Our heaven is everywhere 112 

Our heavenly Father, hear 113 



R. . 
Rise, my soul, and stretch thy wings 



173 



Say not the law divine 117 

Scorn not the slightest word or deed .... 73 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot 81 

Slowly, by God's hand unfurled 122 

Sow in the morn thy seed Ill 

Speak gently: it is better far G2 

Standing upon the mountain top 103 



T. 

Teach me, my God and King 114 

Teach us. Father, how to find thee 135 

Tell me not in mournful numbers 141 

The breaking waves dashed high 120 

The cattle on a thousand hills 84 

The dove let loose in eastern skies 105 

The harp at nature's advent strung 86 

The heavens cannot contain thee, Lord .... 108 

The light pours down from heaven, 164 

The Lord is in his holy temple 186 

The Lord is my Shepherd : no want shall I know 183 

The loving friend to all who bowed 93 

The offerings to thy throne which rise .... 70 

The one life thrilled the star-dust through . . 102 



(xiv) 



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 



The past is dark with sin and shame .... 22 

The shadows fall so gently 16G 

The softened mould is brown and warm ... 100 

The summer days are come again 83 

The very blossoms of our life 30 

The waves unbuild the wasting shore .... 4 

There is a book who runs may read G4 

There is a land mine eye hath seen 39 

There is a strife we all must wage 129 

They call the world a dreary place 42 

Think gently of the erring one 90 

Thou art with me, O my Father 176 

Thou Grace divine, encircling all 104 

Thou long disowned, reviled, oppressed ... 55 

Thou, whose name is blazoned forth 127 

Thy way, not mine, O Lord 115 

'Tis winter now; the fallen snow 24 



PAGE 

We love the venerable house 5'j 

We pray no more, made lowly wise 5S 

AYe remember thee, O brave ones 138 

We'll sing our loving trust in God 85 

What is that goal of human hope 35 

What purpose burns within our hearts .... 3 

What secret x)lace, what distant star 18 

What song shall America sing 105 

AVhen, as returns this solemn day 15 

When, on some strain of music 163 

When the burdens on us press 194 

When the gladsome day declineth 148 

When the truth shall lead us home 132 

When up to nightly skies we gaze 31 

When warmer suns and bluer skies 72 

Where ancient forests widely spread 10 

Who is he fit to teach and guide 5 

Who is thy neighbor ? He whom thou .... 87 

AVisdom has treasures greater far 107 

Work, for the night is coming 162 

Work! it is thy highest mission 144 

AVorkman of God, oh, lose not heart 48 



U. 

Up the pathway of the ages 149 

Upon one land alone 161 

W. Y. 

Walk in the light ! so shalt thou know .... 88 Yes, for me, for me He careth 147 

AVatchman, tell us of the night 133 

AVe are living, we are dwelling 146 i 

(XV) 



INDEX TO TUNES. 



PAGE 

A 

All Saints, L.M 16 

America, 6s & 4s 81 

Amsterdam, 7s & Gs 78 

Arlington, CM 26 

Aiild Lang Syne, CM 36 

Autumn, 8s & 7s 69 

Azmon, CM 47 

B 

Balerma, CM 28 

Barby, CM 46 

Benevento, 7s 58 

Bethany, 6s & 4s 8), 83 

Boylston, S.M 49 

Brattle Street, CM 30 

Browne, S.M 52 

c 

Chatham, 7s 57 

Chester, 8s & 7s 60 

Christmas, CM 23 

D 

Dedham,CM 32 

• Duke Street, L.M 10 

Dundee, CM 34 

E 

Ernan, L.M 20 

F 

Federal Street, L.M 8 

G 

Greenville, 83 & 7s 66, 70 

H 

Hamburg, L.M 14 

Harwell, 8s «& 7s 08 

Hebron, L.M 12 

Hendon, 7s 54 

Hummel, CM 24 



PAGE 
I 

Italian Hymn, 6s & 4s 82 

L 

Laban, S.M 43 

M 

Manoah, CM 44 

Marlow, CM 43 

Meadville, 6s 72 

Metrical Chant, lis & 10s 85 

Missionary Chant, L.M 7 

Missionary Hymn, 7s & 6s 74 

N 

Naomi, C :SI 40 

Nuremburg, 7s . 56 



Old Hundred, L.M 22 

Olmutz, S.M 51 

P 

Peterborough, CM 38 

Pilgrim, 8s & 7s 71 

Pleyel's Hymn, 7s 53 

Portuguese Hymn, lis 84 

S 

Saint Martin's, CM 42 

Saint Thomas, S.M 50 

Sicily, 8s & 7s 62, 64 

Solitude, 7s 55 

Stockwell, 8s & 7s 65 

Vesper, 8s & 7s 67 

W 

Ward, L.M 18 

Watchman, 7s 59 

Webb, 7s & 6s 76.79 

Wilmot, 8s & 7s 63 

Woodstock, CM 45 

Work, for the Night is coming, 7s & 6s ... . 73 



SPECIAL PIECES, ETC. 

Christmas Carol 94 

Christmas Song 97 

Easter Song, solo and quartet 88 

Sentence, basso solo and quartet 86 

The Voice of the Past 87 



Christmas Carol 107 

Christmas Hymn 107 

National Hymn 110 

Prayer for Peace Ill 

The American Song ill 



(XVI) 



INDEX OF METRES. 



PAGE 
LONG METRE. 

All Saints IG 

Duke St 10 

Eman 20 

Federal St 8 

Hamburg 14 

Hebron 12 

Missionary Chant 7 

Old Hundred 22 

Ward 18 



COMMON METRE. 

Arlington 26 

Auld Lang Syne 36 

Azmon 47 

Balerma 28 

Barby 46 

Brattle Street 30 

Christmas 23 

•Dedham 32 

Dundee 34 

Hummel 24 

Manoah 44 

Marlow 43 i 

Naomi 40 

Peterborough 38 

St. Martin's 42 

"Woodstock 45 



SHORT :metre. 

Boylstoii 49 

Browne 52 

Laban 48 

Olmutz 51 

St. Thomas 50 



PAGE 

Harwell 68 

Pilgrim 71 

Sicily 62, 64 

Stockwell 65 

Vesper 67 

Wilmot 63 

7s. 

Benevento 58 

Chatham 57 

Hendon 54 

Nuremburg 56 

Pleyel's Hymn 53 

Solitude 55 

Watchman 59 



7s and 6s. 

Amsterdam 78 

Missionary Hymn 7, 74 



Webb . 

Work, for the night is comini> 



,79 
73 



6s. 



^Vleadville 



6s and 4s. 

America 81 

Bethany 80,83 

Italian Hymn 82 



8.S and 7s. 

Autumn 69 

Chester 60 I 

Greenville 66, 70 | Metrical Chant 



lis. 
Portuguese Hj-mn 84 

lis and 10s. 
etrical Chant 

(xvii) 



83 



INDEX OF AUTHORS. 



Adams, Sarah Flower, 177 

Alford, Henry, 54 

Anon., 1, 39, 53, 72, 73, 81, 110, 132, 142, 155, 158, 164 

Barbauld, A. L.,15, 41 
Barton, Bernard, 88, 117 
Beach, S. C, 11 
Bernard of Cluny, 175 
Blake, J. Vila, 100 
Bonar, H., 29, 115, 147 
Borthwick, Jane, 169 
Bo wring, Sir John, 70, 133, 136 
Bryant, W. C, 25, 38, 52 
Bulfinch, S. G.,129 
Burleigh, G. S., 32 
Burleigh, W. H., 34, 96 

Chadwick, John W., 67, 82, 98, 121, 127 
Conder, Josiah, 128 
Cook, Eliza, 42 
Coxe, A. C, 146 

Doddridge, Philip, 19, 46, 49 
Dorr, Julia C. R., 123 
Drummond, William, 119 
Dwight, J. S.,179 

Elim, 21 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 59 

Faber, Frederic W., 48, 60, 74 
Fletcher, Miss, 90 
Franck, Guillaume, 44 
Frothingham, N. L., 8 
Furness, W. H., 122 

Gannett, W. C , 65, 66, 165 
Gaskell, William, 89, 99 
Gill, T. H.,18 
Good Words, 154 
Gumey, John Hampden, 7 

Hanaford, Phoebe, 62 
Hemans, Felicia, 120 
Hensel, Luise, 137 
Herbert, George, 114 
Higginson, T. W., 22 
Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 4 
Hosmer, F. L., 56, 57, 58, 78, 79 
Howe, 131 



Johns, 116, 118 

Johnson, Samuel, 71, 184, 130, 140, 184 

Keble, John, 64 
Kippis, Andrew, 9 

Longfellow, H. W., 125, 141 

Longfellow, Samuel, 24, 26, 27, 76, 83, 93, 152 

Mace, Frances L., 151 

Martineau, H., 51 

Mason, Miss C. A., 12 

Meigs, Mrs. M. N., 153 

Montgomery, James, 170, 183, 111, 113 

Moore, Henry, 20 

Moore, Thomas, 105 

Newton, J., 139 
Norton, A., 10 

Parker, Theodore, 6 
Peabody, Wm. B. O., 87, 95 
Pope, A., 63 
Procter, A. A., 143 

Richardson, J., 69 
Rippon's Coll., 173 

Savage, M. J., 3, 5, 30, 35, 43, 68, 75, 80, 84, 85, 97, 102, 
103, 108, 109, 126, 135, 138, 145, 148, 149, 156, 159, 160, 
161, 163, 166, 167, 168, 171, 172, 180, 181, 187, 188, 189, 
190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195 

Salisbury Coll., 14 

Saxby, Jane Euphemia, 176 

Scotch Paraphrases, 107 

Scudder, Eliza, 55, 104, 108, 185 

Smith, S. F., 178 

Spirit of the Psalms, 16 

Steele, Anne, 17, 92 

Sterling, John, 28, 31 

Taylor, J., 36, 134, 157 
Thomson, James, 91 
Trench, R. C, 47 

Waterston, Anna C. L., 124 

Watts, Isaac, 13, 43, 45, 61, 106 

Wesley, Charles, 174 

Wesley's Coll., 150 

White, F. M., 144 

Whittier, J. G., 2, 33, 37, 40, 77, 86, 94, 101 

Wotton, Sir Henry, 23 



(xviii) 



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A Hymn of Autumn 

O Lord of seasons! unto thee 
Our hymn with grateful heart we raise 
For all thy gifts, so rich and free, 
That crown these sweet autumnal days. 



By thy dear love, the lap of spring 
Was heaped with many a blooming 

flower. 
And smiling summer joyed to bring 
The sunshine and the gentle shower. 



And autumn pours her riches now 
Of ripening grain and bursting shell ; 
And golden sheaf and laden bough 
The fulness of thy bounty tell. 



^ A Harvest Song 

Once more the liberal year laughs out 
O'er richer stores than o-ems or irold ; 
Once more with harvest-song and shout 
Is Nature's bloodless triumph told. 



O favors every year made new ! 
O blessings with the sunshine sent ! 
The bounty overruns our due ; 
The fulness shames our discontent. 



We shut our eyes, the flowers bloom on *, 
We murmur, but the corn-ears fill ; 
We choose the shadow, but the sun 
That casts it shines behind us still. 



Now let these altars, wreathed with 
Beneath blue skies, the fragrarit breeze ' flowers 

O'er rustling, fallen leaves doth blow ; 



In gold and purple robed, the trees 
The fulness of thy beauty show. 



Anon 



And piled with fruits, awake again 
Thanksgiving for the golden hours, 
The early and the latter rain ! 

J. G. Whittier 



FEDERAL. STREET L. M. 




^ Organizing a Church 

What purpose burns within our hearts 
That we together here should stand, 
Pledging each other mutual vows, 
And ready hand to join in hand? 

We see in vision fair a time 
When evil shall have passed away ; 
And thus we dedicate our lives 
To hasten on that blessed day ; — 

To seek the truth whate'er it be, 
To follow it where'er it leads, 
To turn to facts our dreams of good, 
And coin our lives in loving deeds. 

For this, we organize to-day ; 
To such a church of God we bring 
Our utmost love and loyalty. 
And make our souls an offering. 

M. J. s. 

^ Faith above Creed 

The waves unbuild the wasting shore ; 
Where mountains towered, the billows 

sweep, 
Yet still their borrowed spoils restore. 
And raise new empires from the deep. 



So, while the floods of thought lay waste 
The old domain of chartered creeds. 
Its heaven-appointed tides will haste 
To shape new homes for human needs. 

Be ours to mark with hearts unchilled 
The change an outworn age deplores ; 
The legend sinks, but faith shall build 
A fairer throne on new-found shores. 

The star shall glow in western skies 
That shone o'er Bethlehem's hallowed 

shrine, 
And once again the temple rise 
That crowned the rock of Palestine. 

Not when the wondering shepherds 

bowed 
Did angels sing their latest song, 
Nor yet to Israel's kneeling crowd 
Did heaven's one sacred dome belong. 

Let priest and prophet have their 

dues, — 
The Levite counts but half a man, 
Whose proud salvation of the Jews 
Shuts out the Good Samaritan! 



Though scattered far, the flock may 

stray: 
His own the Shepherd still shall claim, — 
The saints who never learned to pray, 
Tlie friends who never spoke his name. 

Dear Master, while we liear thy voice 
That says, "The truth shall make you 

free," 
Thy servants still by loving choice, 
Oh, keep us faithful unto thee! 

Oliver Wendell Holmes 



S Ordaining a Minister 

Who is he fit to teach and guide 
Those who are seeking out the way 
That, through the darkness of their life. 
Leads up to God's eternal day? 

He who with loyalty to truth 
When she moves forward turns not back ; 
Who shrinks not though the way be hard. 
And shapes of danger throng his track; 

Whose lieart with tenderness can melt ; 
Who knows the weaknesses of men ; 
Who will not quench the smoking flax. 
But kindle to a flame again ; 

He who is patient of delay : 
Who knoweth both to work and wait. 
That God's time never comes too soon. 
And, while he waits, 'tis never late. 

M. J. s. 

V-^ The Advancing God 

In darker days and nights of storm, 
Men knew God but to fear his form ; 
And in the reddest li<i:htniniT:s saw 
His arm avengre insulted law. 



In brighter days, we read his love 
In flowers beneatli, in stars above ; 
And in the track of every storm 
Behold his cheering rainbow form. 

E'en in the reddest lightning's patli, 
We see no vestiges of wrath ; 
But always wisdom, perfect love. 
From flowers below to stars above. 

See, from on high sweet influence rains 
On palace, cottage, mountains, ])lains ! 
No hour of wrath shall mortals fear. 
While true parental love is here. 

Theodore Par Jeer 



7 God is Good 

Our God is good : in earth and sky, 
From ocean-depths and spreading wood, 
Ten thousand voices seem to cry, 
"God made us all, and God is good." 

The sun that keeps his trackless way, 
And downward pours his golden flood, 
Wight's sparkling hosts, all seem to say, 
In accents clear, that God is good. 

I hear it in the rushing breeze : 
The hills that have for ages stood. 
The echoing sky and roaring seas. 
All swell the chorus, "God is good." 

Yea, God is good, all nature says. 
By God's own hand with speech endued ; 
And man, in louder notes of praise. 
Should sing for joy that God is good. 

John Hampden Gurney 



DUKE STREET L. M. 



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God with Us 



O God, whose presence glows in all 
Within, around us, and above ! 
Tliy word we bless, thy name we call. 
Whose word is Truth, whose name is 
Love. 

That truth be with the heart believed 
Of all who seek this sacred place ; 
With power proclaimed, in peace re- 
ceived, — 
Our spirit's light, thy spirit's grace. 

That love its holy influence pour, 
To keep us meek and make us free, 
And throw its binding blessing more 
Round each with all, and all with thee. 



Send down its angel to our side, 
Send in its calm upon the breast ; 
For we would know no other guide. 
And we can need no other rest. 

iV. L. Frothingham 



w God Incomprehensible 

Great God, in vain man's narrow view 
Attempts to look thy nature through : 
Our laboring powers with reverence own 
Thy glories never can be known. 



Not the high seraph's mighty thought, 
Who countless years his God has sought. 
Such wondrous height or depth can find, 
Or fully trace thy boundless mind. 



And yet, thy kindness deigns to show 
Enough for mortal minds to know ; 
While wisdom, goodness, power divine 
Through all thy works and conduct 
shine. 

Oh, may our souls with rapture trace 
Thy works of nature and of grace. 
Explore thy sacred truth, and still 
Press on to know and do thy will ! 

Kippis 



10 



lO Natural Religion 

Wheke ancient forests widely spread, 
Where bends the cataract's ocean-fall, 
On the lone mountain's silent head, 
There are thy temples, God of all ! 

Beneath the dark blue midnight arch. 
Whence myriad suns pour down their 
rays, [marcli. 

Where j^l^^^^ts trace their ceaseless 
Father ! we worship as we gaze. 

All space is holy, for all space 
Is filled by thee ; but human thought 
Burns clearer in some chosen place 
Where thy own works of love are taught. 

Here be they taught! and may we know 
That trust thy servants knew of old. 
Which onward bears through weal or 

w^oe. 
Till decider, fuller life unfold. 

A. Norton 
XX Tlie Presence 

Mysterious Presence, Source of all, — 
The world without, the soul within, — 
Fountain of Life, oh, hear our call. 
And pour thy living w^aters in ! 

Thou breathest in the rushing wind. 
Thy spirit stirs in leaf and flower; 
Xor wilt thou from the willing mind 
Withhold thy light and love and power. 

Thy hand unseen to accents clear 
Awoke the Psalmist's trembling lyre. 
And touched the lips of holy seer 
With flame from thine own altar-fire. 

That touch divine still. Lord, impart ; 
Still give the prophet's burning word ; 
And vocal in each waiting heart 
Let living psalms of praise be heard. 

S. C Beach 



X^ Another Day 

O God, I thank thee for each sight 
Of beauty that thy hand doth give, — 
For sunny skies and air and light ; 

God, I thank thee that I live! 

That life I consecrate to thee ; 
And ever, as the day is born. 
On wings of joy my soul would flee, 
And thank thee for another morn, — 

Another day in which to cast 
Some silent deed of love abroad. 
That, greatening as it journeys past, 
May do some earnest work for God ; 

Another day to do, to dare. 
To tax anew my growing strength. 
To arm my soul Avith faith and prayer. 
And so reach heaven and thee at length. 
Mrs. C. A. Mason 

X^ Retirement and Meditation 

My God, permit me not to be 
A stranger to myself and thee : 
Amidst a thousand thoughts I rove, 
Forgetful of my highest love. 

Why should my passions mix with earth, 
And thus debase my heavenly birth ? 
Why should I cleave to things below. 
And [thus my nobler life forego] ? 

Call me away from flesh and sense, — 
One sovereign word can draw me thence : 

1 would obey the voice divine, 
And all inferior joys resign. 

Be earth, with all her scenes, withdrawn ; 
Let noise and vanity be gone. 
In secret silence of the mind. 
My heaven, and there my God, I find. 

Watts 



11 



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14 TAe iToMse 0/ God 

Lo, God is here ! let us adore 
And humbly bow before his face ; 
Let all within us feel his power, 
Let all within us seek his grace. 

Lo, God is here ! him day and night 
United choirs of angels sing ; 
To him, enthroned above all height, 
Heaven's liost their noblest homa2:e 
brmg. 

Being of beings ! may our praise 
Thy courts with grateful fragrance fill ; 
Still may we stand before thy face. 
Still hear and do thy sovereign will. 

Salisbury Coll. 

X S The Sacrifice of the Heart 

When, as returns this solemn day, 
Man comes to meet his Maker, God, 
What rites, what honors, shall he pay ? 
How spread his Sovereign's praise 
abroad ? 

From marble domes and gilded spires 
Shall curling clouds of incense rise. 
And gems and gold and garlands deck 
The costly pomp of sacrifice ? 



Vain, sinful man ! creation's Lord 
Thy golden offerings well may spare ; 
But give thy heart, and thou shalt find 
Here dwells a God who heareth prayer. 

Mrs. Barhauld 

WJ Eternity of God 

Ere mountains reared their forms sub- 
lime, 
Or heaven and earth in order stood ; 
Before the birth of ancient time ; 
From everlasting, — thou art God. 

A thousand ages in their flight 
With thee are as a fleeting day : 
Past, present, future, to thy sight 
At once their various scenes display. 

But our brief life's a shadowy dream, 
A passing thought that soon is o'er ; 
That fades with morning's earliest 

beam. 
And fills the musing mind no more. 

To us, O Lord ! the wisdom give 
Each passing moment so to spend 
That we at length with thee may live 
Where life and bliss shall never end. 

Spirit of the Psalms 



12 



±7 Religious Resolves 

May I resolve with all my heart, 
With all ray powers to serve the Lord ; 
Nor from his precejots e'er depart, 
Whose service is a rich reward ! 

Be this the purpose of the soul, 
My solemn, my determined choice, — 
To yield to his supreme control. 
And in his kind commands rejoice. 

Oh, may I never faint nor tire. 
Nor, wandering, leave his sacred ways ! 
Great God, accept my soul's desire, 
And give me strength to live thy praise. 

Anne Steele 



19 



Devotion to God 



18 



God ever Near 



What secret place, what distant star, 
O Lord of all, is thine abode ? 
Why dwellest thou from us so far ? 
We yearn for thee, thou hidden God. 

And not in vain we seek, we yearn ; 
We need not stretch our weary wings : 
Thou meetest us where'er we turn ; 
Thou dwellest, Lord, within all things. 

O Glory that no eye can bear ! 
O Presence bright, our inward guest ! 
O farthest off, most closely near. 
Most hidden and most manifest! 

No need, in search of thine abode. 
Through starry spheres our thoughts 

should roam, 
Thou, Holy Spirit, mighty God, 
Dost make in human hearts thy home ! 

T. H. Gill 



My gracious God, I own thy right 
To every service I can pay ; 
And call it my supreme delight 
To hear thy dictates, and obey. 

What is my being but for thee. 
Its sure support, its noblest end, — 
Thy ever smiling face to see, 
And serve the cause of such a friend ? 

Thy work my feeble age shall bless. 
When youthful vigor is no more ; 
And my last hour of life confess 
Thy love hath animating i^wer. 

Doddridge 



20 



Wisdom and Virtue sought from God 



Assist us. Lord, to act, to be 
What nature and thy laws decree, 
Worthy that intellectual flame 
Which from thy breathing Spirit came. 

Our moral freedom to maintain, 
Bid passion serve and reason reign. 
Self-poised, and independent still 
On this world's varying good or ill. 

May our expanded souls disclaim 
The narrow view, the selfish aim ; 
But with a [world-wide love] embrace 
Whate'er is friendly to our race. 

O Father ! grace and virtue grant ; 
No more we wish, no more we want : 
To know, to serve thee, and to love, 
Is peace below, — is bliss above. 

Henry Moore 



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^ Prayer for Faith 



I ASK not wealth, but power to take 
And use the things I have aright ; 
Not years, but wisdom that shall make 
My life a profit and delight. 

I ask not that for me the plan 
Of good and ill be set aside. 
But that the common lot of man 
Be nobly borne and glorified. 

I know I may not always keep 
My steps in places green and sweet. 
Nor find the pathway of the deep 
A path' of safety to my feet ; 

But pray that, when the tempest's breath 
Shall fiercely sweep my way about, 
I make not shipwreck of my faith 
In the unfathomed sea of doubt. 

Elim 



22 



TIi£. Hope of Man 



The past is dark with sin and shame. 
The future dim with doubt and fear ; 
But, Father, yet we praise thy name, 
Whose guardian love is always near. 

For man has striven, ages long. 
With faltering steps to come to thee; 
And, in each purpose high and strong. 
The influence of thy grace could see. 

He could not breathe an earnest prayer, 
But thouwast kinder than he dreamed. 
As age by age brought hopes more fair. 
And nearer still thy kingdom seemed. 

But never rose within his breast 
A trust so calm and deep as now : 
Shall not the weary find a rest? 
Father, Preserver, answer thou! 

T. W. Iligginson 



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^H ^n Independent and Happy Life 

How HAPPY is he, born or taught, 
Who serveth not another's will ; 
Whose armor is his honest thouglit, 
And simple truth his highest skill; 

Whose passions not his masters are ; 
Whose soul is still prepared for death, 
Not tied unto the world with care 
Of prince's ear or vulgar breath ; 

Who God doth late and early pray 
More of his grace than goods to lend ; 
And walks with man, from day to day, 
As with a brother and a friend, — 

This man is freed from servile bands 
Of hope to rise or fear to fall ; 
Lord of himself, though not of lands, 
And, having nothing, yet hath all. 

Sir Henry Wotton 
24 Winter 

'Tis winter now ; the fallen snow 
Has left the heavens all coldly clear; 
Through leafless boughs the sharp winds 

blow. 
And all the earth lies dead and drear. 

And yet God's love is not withdrawn ; 
His life within the keen air breathes. 
His beauty paints the crimson dawm 
And clothes the boughs wdth glittering- 
wreaths. 

And tho' abroad the sharp winds blow^, 
And skies are chill and frosts are keen. 
Home closer draws her circle now. 
And Avarmer glows her light within. 

O God, who giv'st the winter's cold 
As well as summer's joyous rays, 
Us warmly in thy love enfold, 
And keep us through life's wintry days. 

S. Longfellow 



^S The Mother's Hymn 

LoKD, who ordainest for mankind 
Benignant toils and tender cares. 
We thank thee for the ties that bind 
The mother to the child she bears. 

We thank thee for the hopes that rise 
Withni her heart as, day by day, 
The dawning soul from those young eyes 
Looks with a clearer, steadier ray. 

And, grateful for the blessing given. 
With that dear infant on her knee, 
She trains the eye to look to heaven. 
The voice to lisjD a prayer to thee. 

All-gracious! grant to those Avho bear 
A mother's chars-e the strens^th and liixht 
To guide the feet that own their care 
In w^ays of love and truth and right. 

Bryant 

^\J Vesper Hymn 

Agaix, as evening's shadow^ falls, 
We gather in these hallowed w^alls; 
And vesper hymn and vesper prayer 
Rise mingling on the holy air. 

May struggling hearts that seek release 
Here find the rest of God's own peace ; 
And, strengthened here by hymn and 

prayer. 
Lay do^vn the burden nnd the care ! 

O God, our light ! to thee we bow ; 
Within all shadows standest thou : 
Give deeper calm than night can bring, 
Give sweeter songs than lips can sing. 

Life's tumult we must meet again; 
We cannot at the shrine remain ; 
But, in the spirit's secret cell. 
May hymn and prayer forever dwell ! 

S. Longfellow 



15 



ALL SAINTS L. M. 



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Greeting 



O Life that maketh all things new, — 
The blooming earth, the thoughts of 

men! 
Our pilgrim feet, wet with thy dew, 
In gladness hither turn again. 

From hand to hand the greeting flows. 
From eye to eye the signals run. 
From heart to heart the bright hope 

glows : 
The seekers of the Light are one, — 

One in the freedom of the truth. 
One in the joy of paths untrod. 
One in the soul's perennial youth. 
One in the larger thought of God, — 

The freer step, the fuller breath, 
The wide horizon^s grander view, 
The sense of life that knows no deatli, 
The Life that maketh all things new. 

S. LonyfeUow 



28 



The Love of God 



O Source divine and Life of all. 
The Fount of being's wondrous sea ! 
Thy depth would every heart appall 
That saw not love supreme in thee. 

We shrink before thy vast abyss. 
Where worlds on worlds unnumbered 

brood : 
We know thee truly but in this, — 
That thou bestowest all our good. 

And so, 'mid boundless time and space, 
Oh, grant us still in thee to dwell. 
And through the ceaseless web to trace 
Thy presence working all things well! 

Bestow on every joyous thrill 
A deeper tone of reverent awe ; 
Make pure thy children's erring will, 
And teach their hearts to love thy law 

John Sterling 



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^O Lifers Cleaning 

He liveth long who liveth well : 
All else is being flung away. 
He livetl^ longest who can tell 
Of true things truly done each day. 

Be wise, and use thy wisdom well : 
Who wisdom speaks must live it, too. 
He is the wisest who can tell 
How first he lived, then spake, the true. 

Sow truth, if thou the true would'st 

reap : 
Who sows the false shall reap the vain ; 
Erect and sound thy conscience keep ; 
From hollow words and deeds refrain. 

Sow love, and taste its fruitage pure ; 
Sow peace, and reap its harvest bright ; 
Sow sunbeams on the rock and moor, 
And find a harvest home of light. 

Bonar 



Consecration of Children 



30 

The very blossoms of our life, 
Tlie treasures that no wealth could buy. 
We freely bring them here to-day 
And give tliem up to thee, Most High. 

Xot, as in olden times, to death. 
To hermit life, or darksome days ; 
But unto beauty, goodness, truth. 
To all high thoughts and noble ways. 

To find and serve thee in the world, 
By seeking truth and helping men, — 
To this we consecrate them now. 
And day by day will o'er again. 



Thus do we keep them while we give. 
And make them still of nobler worth. 
When all tlie world is given thus, 
Heav'n will indeed have come on earth* 

M. J. s. 



31 



Not Afar Off 



17 



When up to nightly skies we gaze. 
Where stars pursue their endless ways, 
We think we see from earth's low clod 
The wide and shining home of God. 

But, could we rise to moon or sun, 
Or path where planets duly run, 
Still, heaven would spread above us far, 
And earth remote would seem a star. 

This earth, with all its dust and tears, 
Is his, no less than yonder spheres ; 
And rain-drops weak and grains of sand 
Are stamjDcd by his immediate hand. 

The rock, the wave, the little flower, — 
All fed by streams of living power 
That spring from one almighty will, — 
Whate'er his thought conceives fulfil. 

We view those halls of painted air. 
And own tliy presence makes them fair; 
But nearer still to thee, O Lord, 
Is he whose thoughts with thine accord. 

Sterling 



WARD L. M. 



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32 



" TFAy seeA: ^e fAe Living among the 
Dead" 



Ah ! why should bitter tears be shed 
In sorrow o'er the mounded sod. 
When verily there are no dead 
Of all the children of our God? 



They who are lost to outward sense 
Have but flung off their robes of clay, 
And, clothed in heavenly radiance. 
Attend us on our lowly way. 



And oft their spirits breathe m ours 
The hope and strength and love of theirs, 
AVhich bloom as bloom the early flowers 
In breath of summer's viewless airs. 



Let living Faith serenely pour 
Her sunlight on our pathway dim. 
And Death can have no terrors more; 
But holy joy shall walk with him. 

G. S. Burleigh 



33 



Very Near 



Oh, sometimes comes to soul and sense 
The feeling which is evidence 
That very near about us lies 
The realm of spirit-mysteries. 



The low and dark horizon lifts. 
To light the scenic terror shifts ; 
The breath of a diviner air 
Blows down the answer of a prayer. 



Then all our sorrow, pain, and doubt 
A great compassion clasps about ; 
And law and goodness, love and force. 
Are v/edded fast beyond divorce. 



Then, Duty leaves to Love its task. 
The beggar Self forgets to ask; 
We feel, as flowers the sun and dew. 
The One True Life our own rene\\\ 

J. G. Whittier 



18 



34 



The Harvest-Call 



Abide not in the realm of dreams, 
O man, however fair it seems; 
But with clear eve the present scan. 
And hear the call of God and man. 

Think not in sleep to fold thy hands. 
Forgetful of tliy Lord's commands : 
From duty's claims no life is free, — 
Behold, to-day hath need of thee ! 

While the day lingers, do thy best. 
Full soon the night will bring its rest ; 
And, duty done, that rest shall be 
Full of beatitudes to thee. 

William H. Burleigh 



36 



True Length of Life 



35 



Heaven 



What is that goal of human hope, 
That heaven, where every soul is blest ? 
'Tis light for those who darkly grope ; 
To weary ones, 'tis perfect rest ; 

To young and eager souls, a place 
Where high deeds may be grandly 

wrought ; 
To those who mourn some absent face, 
'Tis where the lost ones may be sought. 

It is a land where each may find 

That which in vain he sought for here; 

Where every element is kind. 

And summer reigns the live-long year. 

Is there a country such as this? 
Some glad day thou shalt know, O soul! 
Hope whispers of tlie perfect bliss, 
And points her finger toward the goal. 

M. J. s. 



Like shadows gliding o'er the plain, 
Or clouds that roll successive on, 
Man's busy generations pass ; [gone. 
And, while we gaze, their forms are 

O Father, in whose mighty hand 
The boundless years and ages lie. 
Teach us thy boon of life to prize. 
And use the moments as they fiy ; 

To crowd the narrow span of life 
With wise designs and virtuous deeds : 
So shall we wake from death's dark niglit 
To share the glory that succeeds. 

J. Taylor 



^/ The Parting here, the Greeting there 

God giveth quietness at last ! 
The common way once more is passed 
From pleading tears and lingerings fond 
To fuller life and love beyond. 



Fold the rapt soul in your embrace, 
Dear ones familiar with the place ! 
While to the gentle greetings there, 
We answer here with murmured prayer. 

O silent land to which we move ! 
Enough if there alone be love. 
And mortal need can ne'er outgrow 
What it is waiting to bestow ! 

O pure soul ! from that far-off shore 
Float some sweet song the waters o'er: 
Our faith confirm, our fears dispel. 
With the dear voice we loved so well ! 

John G. Whittier 



19 



BRNAN L. M. 




38 



Blessed are they that mourn 



Deem not that they are blest alone, 
Whose days a peaceful tenor keep : 
The God who loves our race has shown 
A blessing for the eyes that weep. 



The light of smiles shall fill again 
The lids that overflow with tears, 
And weary hours of woe and pain 
Are earnests of serener years. 



Oh, there are days of hope and rest 
For every dark and troubled night! 
And grief may bide, an evening guest ; 
But joy shall come with early light. 



And thou who o'er thy friend's low bier 
Dost shed tlie bitter drops like rain, 
Hope that a brighter, happier sphere 
Will give him to thy arms again. 

Bryant 



39 



The Better Land 



There is a land mine eye hath seen 
In visions of enraptured thought, 
So bright that all which spreads between 
Is with its radiant glory fraught ; 



A land upon whose blissful shore 
There rests no shadow, falls no stain ; 
There those who meet shall part no 

more. 
And those long parted meet again. 



Its skies are not like earthly skies, 
With varying hues of shade and light : 
It hath no need of suns to rise. 
To dissipate the gloom of night. 

There sweeps no desolating wind 
Across that calm, serene abode : 
The wanderer there a home may find 

Within the paradise of God. 

Anon 



20 



40 



The Seed 



Now is the seed-time ; God alone, 
Beyond our vision weak and dim, 
Beholds the end of what is sown : 
The harvest-time is hid with him. 

Yet unforgotten Avhere it lies, 
Thougli seeming on the desert cast, 
The seed of gen'rous sacrifice 
Shall rise with bloom and fruit, at last. 

And he who blesses most is blest ; 
For God and man shall own his worth 
Who toils to leave as his bequest 
An added beauty on the earth. 

J. G. Whittier 



ZLX The Righteous blessed in Death 



How 



the rio;hteous when he 



BLESSED 

dies ! 
When sinks a weary soul to rest. 
How mildly beam the closing eyes. 
How gently heaves the expiring breast ! 

So fades a summer cloud away. 

So sinks the gale when storms are o'er, 

So gently shuts the eye of day, 

So dies a wave along the shore. 

A holy quiet reigns around, 
A calm which life nor death destroys. 
Nothing disturbs that peace profound 
Which his unfettered soul enjoys. 

Farewell, conflicting hopes and fears, 
Where lights and shades alternate dwell : 
How bright th' unchanging nuu'n ap- 
pears ! 
Farewell, inconstant world, farewell. 



Life's duty done, as sinks the clay, 
Light from its load the spirit flies ; 
While heaven and earth combine to say, 
"How blessed the righteous when he 
dies ! " 

Mrs. Barhauld 



42 



The Beauty of the World. 



They call the world a dreary place. 
And tell long tales of sin and woe, 
As if there were no blessed trace 
Of sunshine to be found below. 



They point, when autumn winds 

[wail by]. 
To falling leaves and withered flowers; 
But shall we mourn them [when they 

die], 
And never note their brilliant hours ? 



They mark the rainbow's fading light. 
And say it is the type of man, — 
" So passeth he " ; but, oh, how bright 
The transient glory of the span ! 

They liken life unto the stream 
That swift and shallow pours along ; 
But beauty marks the rippling gleam, 
And music fills the bubblimi^ sonij^. 



Oh, why should our on^n hands [thus 

twine] 
Dark chaplets from the cypress tree ? 
Why in each gloomy spot repine. 
When further on sweet buds may be ? 

Eliza C 'ok 



21 



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43 



Doxology 



Now, as the parting hour is nigh, 
In our last song, with glad refrain, 
To God on earth and in the sky 
We lift both voice and heart again. 

Soon may that blessed morn arise 
When, o'er the earth, from east to west. 
Thy light shall flood the earth and skies. 
And all mankind in thee be blest! 

M. J. s. 

ZLZL Doxology 

Be thou, O God, exalted high ; 
And, as thy glory fills the sky. 
So let it be on earth displayed. 
Till thou art here, as there, obeyed. 

Guillaume Fr ancle 



45 



Praise 



FiiOM all that dwell below the skies. 
Let the Creator's praise arise; 
Let [love and righteousness] be sung 
Through every land by every tongue. 



1 



Eternal are thy mercies, Lord; 
Eternal truth attends thy word: 
Thy praise shall sound from shore to 
shore. 

Till suns shall rise and set no more. 

Watts 



46 



The Opening Year 

Great God, we sing that mighty hand 
By which supported still we stand : 
The opening year thy mercy shows ; 
Thy mercy crown it till it close ! 

By day, by night, at home, abroad. 
Still we are guarded by our God ; 
By his incessant bounty fed. 
By his unerring counsel led. 

With grateful hearts the past we own ; 
The future, all to us unknown, 
We to thy guardian care commit. 
And peaceful leave before thy feet. 

In scenes exalted or depressed. 
Be thou our joy and thou our rest : 
Thy goodness all our hopes shall raise. 
Adored through all our changing days. 

Doddridge 



CHRISTMAS 



CM. 




4 / The Law of Love 

Make channels for the streams of love, 
Where they may broadly run ; 

And love has overflowing founts 
To fill them every one. 

But if, at any time, we cease 

Such channels to provide. 
The very founts of love for us 

Will soon be parched and dried. 

For we must share, if we would keep, 

That blessing from above : 
Ceasing to give, we cease to have, — 

Such is the law of love. 

R. C. Trench 



48 



WorJcinrj ici'th God 



Workman of God, oh, lose not heart, 
But learn wliat God is like ! 

And, in the darkest battle-field, 
Thou slialt know where to strike. 

Oh, blest is he who can divine 

Where real right doth lie, 
And dares to take the side that seems 

Wrong to man's blindfold eye. 



Oh, learn to scorn the praise of men ! 

Oh, learn to lose with God ! 
For Jesus won the world through shame. 

And beckons thee his road. 

Frederic W. Faher 

49 ^^'^ ^^^^ ^/ ^if^ 

Awake, my soul ; stretch every nerve, 

And press with vigor on : 
X heaA^enly race demands thy zeal, 

And an immortal crown. 

A cloud of witnesses around 

Hold thee in full survey : 
Forget the steps already trod, 

And onward urge thy way. 

'Tis God's all-animating voice 
That calls thee from on high ; 

'Tis his own hand presents the prize 
To thine aspiring eye, — 

That prize, with peerless glories bright, 

Which shall new lustre boast 
When victors' wreaths and monarchs' 



gems 
Shall blend in common dust. 



23 



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S vJ Receptivity 

Ope, ope, my soul ! Around thee press 

A thousand things divine : 
All glory and all holiness 

Are waiting to be thine. 

Lie open : Love and Duty stand. 

Thy guardian angels, near. 
To lead thee gently by the hand, — 

Their words of welcome hear. 

Lie open, soul : the Beautiful, 
That all things doth embrace. 

Shall every passion sweetly lull. 
And clothe thee in her grace. 

Lie open, soul ; the great and wise 

About thy portal throng ; 
The wealth of souls before thee lies. 

Their gifts to thee belong. 

Lie open, soul : in watchfulness 

Each brighter glory win ; 
The Infinite thy peace shall bless. 

And God shall enter in. 



SX All Equal before God 

All men are equal in their birth, 
Heirs of the earth and skies; 

All men are equal when that earth 
Fades from their dying eyes. 

God meets the throngs who pay their 
vows 

Li courts that hands have made. 
And hears the worshipper who bows 

Beneath the plantain shade. 

'Tis man alone who difference sees. 
And speaks of high and low, 

And worships those and tramples these, 
While the same path they go. 

Oh, let man hasten to restore 

To all their rights of love ! 
In power and wealth exult no more. 

In wisdom lowly move. 



Ye 



your earth-born 



great, renounce 
pride ; 

Ye low, your shame and fear : 
Live, as ye worship, side by side ; 

Your brotherhood revere. 

H. Martineau 



24 



R^ Dedication 

O Thou whose own vast temple stands 

Built over earth and sea! 
Accept the walls that human hands 

Have raised to worsliip thee. 

Lord, from thine inmost glory send, 
Within these courts to bide, 

The peace that dwelleth without end 
Serenely by thy side. 

May erring minds that worship here 

Be taught the better way, 
And they who mourn, and they who fear, 

Be strengthened as they pray ! 

May faith grow firm, and love grow 
warm. 
And 23ure devotion rise, 
While round these hallowed walls the 
storm 
Of earth-born passion dies ! 

Bryant 



53 



On the Lord's Side 



God's trumpet wakes the slumbering 
world : 

Now, each man to his post ! 
The red-cross banner is unfurled, — 

Who joins the glorious host? 

He who in fealty to the Truth, 

And counting all the cost. 
Doth consecrate his gen'rous youth, — 

He joins the noble host! 

He who, no anger on his tongue, 

Nor any idle boast. 
Bears steadfast witness against wrong, — 

He joins the sacred host ! 



He who, with calm, undaunted will. 
Ne'er coimts the battle lost. 

But, though defeated, battles still, — 
He joins the faithful host! 

He who is ready for the cross, 

The cause despised loves most. 

And shuns not pain, nor shame, nor 

loss, — 

He joins the martyr host! 

Anon 

^4 ^^ ^^"^ ^^ Yourselj 

Be true to every inmost thought ; 

Be as thy thought thy speech ; 
What thou hast not by suffering bought, 

Presume thou not to teach. 

Woe, woe to him, on safety bent. 
Who creeps to age from youth. 

Failing to grasp his life's intent, 
Because he fears the truth. 

Show forth thy light! If conscience 
gleam, 

Cherish the rising glow : 
The smallest spark may shed its beam 

O'er thousand hearts below. 

Guard thou the fact, though clouds of 
night 
Down on thy watch-tower stoop. 
Though thou shouldst see thine heart's 
delight 
Borne from thee by their swoop. 

Face thou the wind, though safer seem 

In shelter to abide. 

We were not made to sit and dream : 

The true must first be tried. 

Alford 



25 



ARLINGTON C. M. 



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55 ^^^ Waiting God 

Thou long-disowned, reviled, oppressed 
Strange friend of human kind, 

Seeking through Aveary years a rest 
Within our hearts to find, — 

How late thy bright and awful brow 
Breaks through these clouds of sin ! 

Hail, Truth divine, we know thee now! 
Angel of God, come in ! 

Come, though with purifying fire 

And desolating sword! 
Thou of all nations the desire, 

Earth waits thy cleansing word. 

Struck by the lightning of thy glance. 

Let old oppressions die ; 
Before thy cloudless countenance. 

Let fear and falsehood fly. 

Flood our dark life with golden day. 

Convince, subdue, enthrall ; 
Then to a mightier yield thy sway. 

And Love be all in all ! 

Eliza Scudder 



56 



So Far^ so Near 



Thou in all thy might so far, 

In all thy love so near. 
Beyond the range of sun and star, 

And yet beside ns here ! 

What heart can comprehend thy name. 
Or, searching, find thee out ? 

Who art, within, a quickening flame, 
A presence round about. 

Yet, though I know thee but in part, 

I ask not, Lord, for more : 
Enough for me to know thou art. 

To love thee and adore. 

Oh, sweeter than aught else besides, 

The tender mystery 
That like a veil of shadow hides 

The Light I may not see ! 

And dearer than all things I know 

Is child-like faith to me. 

That makes the darkest way I go 

An open path to thee 1 

^ ^ F. L. Hosmer 



26 



57 



Divine Help 



O NAME all Other names above, 

What art thou not to me, 
Now I have learned to trust thy love 

And cast my care on thee ! 

What is our being but a cry, 

A restless longing still, 
Which thou alone canst satisfy, 

Alone thy fulness fill? 

Thrice blessed be the holy souls 

That lead the way to thee, 
That burn upon the martyr rolls 

And lists of prophecy ! 

And sweet it is to tread the ground 
O'er which their faith hath trod ; 

But sweeter far, when thou art found, 
The soul's own sense of God. 

The thought of thee all sorrow calms : 

Our anxious burdens fall ; 
His crosses turn to triumph-palms 

Who finds in God his all. 

F. L. Hosmer 



58 



A Song of Faith 



We pray no more, made lowly wise, 

For miracle and sign : 
Anoint our eyes to see within 

The common the divine. 

We turn, from seeking thee afar 

And in unw^onted ways, 
To build from out our daily lives 

The temples of thy praise. 



And if thy casual comings. Lord, 

To hearts of old w^ere dear. 
What joy shall dwell within the faith 

That feels thee ever near ! 

And nobler yet shall duty grow. 

And more shall worship be. 

When thou art found in all our life. 

And all our life in thee. 

/'. L. Hosmer 



59 



The House our Fathers built to God 



27 



We love the venerable house 

Our fathers built to God ; 
In heaven are kept their grateful vows. 

Their dust endears the sod. 

Here, holy thoughts a light have shed 

From many a radiant face, 
And prayers of tender hope have spread 

A perfume through the place. 

And anxious hearts have pondered here 

The mystery of life, 
And prayed the Eternal Spirit clear 

Their doubts and aid their strife. 

From humble tenements around 

Came up the pensive train, 
And in the church a blessing found. 

Which filled their homes again. 

They live wnth God, their homes are 
dust ; 

But here their children pray. 
And, in this fleeting lifetime, trust 

To find the narrow way. 

Ralph Waldo Fmerson 



BALERMA C. M. 




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60 



Ow ^Ae jPieZc? 



Oh, blest is he to whom is given 
The instinct that can tell 

That God is on the field, when he 
Is most invisible. 



And blest is he who can divine 

Where real right doth lie, 
And dares to take the side that seems 

Wrong to man's blindfold eye. 

Oh, learn to scorn the praise of men ! 

Oh, learn to lose — with God! 
For Jesus won the world through shame, 

And beckons thee his road. 



And right is right, since God is God ; 

And right the day must win : 

To doubt would be disloyalty, 

To falter would be sin. 

F. W. Faber 



61 



Breathing after Holiness 



Oh, that the Lord would guide my ways 

To keep his statutes still ! 
Oh, that my God would grant me grace 

To know and do his will ! 



Oh, send thy Spirit down, to write 
Thy law upon my heart ! 

]^or let my tongue indulge deceit. 
Nor act the liar's part. 



From vanity turn off mine eyes ; 

Let no corrupt design, 
Nor covetous desires, arise 

Within this soul of mine. 



Order my footsteps by thy word. 
And make my heart sincere ; 

Let sin have no dominion, Lord, 
But keep my conscience clear. 



Watts 



28 



62 



speak Gently 



Speak gently, — it is better far 

To rule by love than fear ; 
Speak gently, — let no harsh word mar 

The good we may do here. 

Speak gently to the young, for they 

Will have enougli to bear : 
Pass through this life as best they may, 

'Tis full of anxious care. 

Speak gently to the aged one, 
Grieve not the careworn heart. 

The sands of life are nearly run, — 
Let them in peace depart. 

Speak gently to the erring ones : 
They must have toiled in vain. 

Perchance, unkindness made them so ; 
Oh, win them back again ! 

Speak gently, — 'tis a little thing 
Dropped in the heart's deep well : 

The good, the joy that it may bring, 
Eternity shall tell. 

Hanaford 



63 



The Universal Prayer 



Father of all ! in every age, 

In every clime adored. 
By saint, by savage, or by sage, 

Jehovah, Jove, or Lord ! 

Thou great First Cause, least understood, 

Who all my sense confined 
To know but this, — that thou art good 

And that myself am blind ; 

What conscience dictates to be done 

Or warns me not to do, 
This teach me more than hell to shun, 

That more than heaven pursue. 



If I am right, thy grace impart 

Still in tlie right to stay; 
If I am w^rong, oh, teach my heart 

To find that better way ! 

Teach me to feel another's woe, 

To hide the fault I see. 
The mercy I to others show, 

That mercy show to me. 

This day be bread and peace my lot; 

All else beneath the sun 
Thou knowest if best bestowed or not, — 

And let thy will be done ! 

To thee whose temple^ is all space. 
Whose altar earth, sea, skies. 

One chorus let all beings raise, 
All nature's incense rise ! 



A. Pope 



64 



The Booh of Nature 



There is a book who runs may read. 
Which heavenly truth imparts. 

And all the lore its scholars need 
Pure eyes and [earnest] hearts. 

The works of God, above, below. 

Within us and around. 
Are pages in that book, to show 

How God himself is found. 

The glorious sky, embracing all, 

Is like the Maker's love. 
Wherewith encompassed, great and small 

In peace and order move. 

Thou who hast given us eyes to see 

And love this sight so fair, 
Give us a heart to find out thee. 

And read thee everywhere ! 



Keble 



29 



BRATTLE STREET CM. 



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From heart to heart, from creed to creed, 

The hidden river runs : 
It quickens all the ages down. 

It binds the sires to sons, — 
The stream of Faith, whose source is God, 

Whose sound the sound of prayer. 
Whose meadows are the holy lives 

Upspringing everywhere. 

And still it moves, a broadening flood, 

And fresher, fuller grows, 
A sense as if the sea were near 

Toward wliich the river flows. 
O Thou who art the secret Source 

That rises in each soul. 
Thou art the Ocean, too, — thy charm 

That ever-deepening roll ! 

W. C. Gannett 



Listening 



I HEAR it often in the dark, 

I hear it in the light, — 
Where is the voice that comes to me 

With such a quiet might ? 
It seems but echo to my thought, 

And yet beyond the stars ! 
It seems a heart-beat in a hush, 

And yet the planet jars! 

Oh, may it be that far within 

My inmost soul there lies 
A spirit-sky^ that opens with 

Those voices of surprise ? 
Thy heaven is mine, — my very soul! 

Thy words are sweet and strong : 
They fill my inward silences 

With music and with song. 



30 



They send me challenges to right, 

And loud rebuke my ill ; 
They ring my bells of victory ; 

They breathe my " Peace, be still ! " 
They ever seem to say : " My child, 

Why seek me so all day? 
Xow journey inward to thyself, 

And listen by the way ! " 

W, C, Gannett 



68 



Clouds 



67 



A Song of Trusty 



Love divine, of all that is 
The sweetest still and best, 

Fain would I come and rest to-night 
Upon thy tender breast. 

1 pray thee, turn me not away; 

For, sinful though I be, 
Thou knowest everything I need, 
And all my need of thee. 

And yet the spirit in my heart 

Says, Wherefore should I pray [love. 
That thou shouldst seek me with thy 

Since thou dost seek alway ? 
And dost not even wait until 

I urge my steps to thee. 
But in the darkness of my life 

Art coming still to me. 

But thou wilt hear the thought I mean 

And not the words I say ; 
Wilt hear the thanks among the words 

That only seem to pray. 
Still, still thy love will beckon me. 

And still thy strength will come 
In many ways to bear me up 

And bring me to my home. 

John W. Chadwich 



A LOWERING sky with heavy clouds 

That darken all the day! 
'Tis often thus in human life 

We walk our clouded way. 
But still I know the sun shines on. 

Though mist the earth enshrouds: 
The sun himself the vapors lifts. 

Or there would be no clouds. 

It is the sun's glad rays that cast 
The shadows wide and deep. 

Thus, though I stumble in the dark. 
Faith in the light I'll keep. 

For he that lifts from marshy lands 
These clouds that trail the sky. 

Will scatter, melt in rain, or change 



To beauty by and by. 



M. J. s. 



UU The Hymn of Summer 

How GLAD the tone when summer's sun 

Wreathes the gay world with flowers, 
And trees bend down with golden fruit, 

And birds are in their bowers. 
The morn sends silent music down 

Upon each earthly thing ; 
And always since creation's dawn 

The stars together sing. 

Shall man remain in silence, then. 

While all beneath the skies 
The chorus join? No : let us sing; 

And, while our voices rise. 
Oil, let our lives, great God ! breathe forth 

A constant melody. 
And every action be a tone 

In that sweet hymn to thee ! 

J. Richardson 



31 



DBDHAM C. M. 



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70 



Pure Worship 



The offerings to thy throne which rise, 
Of mingled praise and prayer, 

Are but a worthless sacrifice, 
Unless the heart is there. 

Upon thine all-discerning ear 
Let no vain words intrude, 

No tribute but the vow sincere, — 
The tribute of the good. 

My offerings will indeed be blest, 

If sanctified by thee. 
If thy pure spirit touch my breast 

With its own purity. 

Oh, may that spirit warm my heart 

To piety and love, 
And to life's lowly vale impart 

Some rays from heaven above ! 

Bowring 



71 



The City of God 



City of God, how broad and far 
Outspread thy walls sublime ! 

The true thy chartered freemen are 
Of every age and clime. 

One holy Church, one army strong, 

One steadfast high intent. 
One working band, one harvest-song, 

One King Omnipotent 

How purely hath thy speech come down 
From man's primeval youth ! 

How grandly hath thy empire grown 
Of Freedom, Love, and Truth! 

In vain the surge's angry shock. 

In vain the drifting sands, 
Unharmed, upon the Eternal Rock, 

The Eternal City stands. 

S. Johnson 



32 



7^ Hymn of Spring 

Whex warmer suns and bluer skies 

Proclaim the opening year, 
What happy sounds of life arise, 

What lovely scenes appear! 

Earth with her thousand voices sings 
Her song of gladsome praise, 

And every blade of grass that springs 
God's loving law obeys. 

The early flowers bloom bright and fair. 
Fair shines the morning sky, 

The birds make music in the air. 
The brook goes singing by. 

Like this spring morning sweet and clear, 
That greets our gladdened eyes. 

The spring of heaven's eternal year 
Shall bring new earth and skies. 

Anon 

73 ^'^^''^ 

Scorn not the slightest word or deed, 
Xor deem it void of power : 

There's fruit in each wind-wafted seed 
That waits its natal hour. 

A whispered word may touch the heart, 

And call it back to life ; 
A look of love bid sin depart. 

And still unholy strife. 

Xo act falls fruitless ; none can tell 
How vast its power may be, 

Nor what results infolded dwell 
Within it silently. 

Work on, despair not ; bring thy mite, 

Xor care how small it be : 
God is witli all that serve the right, 

The holy, true, and free. 

Anon 



74 



The Divine Will 



I WORSHIP thee, sweet Will of God, 

And all thy ways adore ; 
And, every day I live, I long 

To love thee more and more. 

He always wins who sides with God ; 

To him no chance is lost : 
God's will is sweetest to him when 

It triumphs at his cost. 

Ill that God blesses is our good. 
And unblest good is ill ; [wrong, 

And all is right that seems most 
If it be his dear will ! 

I have no cares, O blessed Will, 
For all my cares are thine. 

I live in triumph. Lord ; for thou 
Hast made thy triumphs mine. 

Frederic W. Faber 
7 S God's Anvil 

I BREATHE the fiery furnace breath ; 

I feel God's hammer-blows ; 
I faint as in the grip of death, 

As round his hard laws close. 

Let me be patient ; for 'tis love 

Enkindles all the flame. 
The blows his faithful kindness prove. 

And echo his dear name. 

His tender hand, with iron grasp. 

Me on the anvil holds ; [clasp 

His breath the flames that round me 
With fiercely-burning folds. 

By fiery forge and hammer blow 

The ore of life and thought 
Are shaped, until their uses show 

That skill divine hath wrouc^ht. 



M. J. 8 



33 



DUNDEE C. M. 



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76 



Z'Ae Church Universal 



One holy Church of God appears 
Through every age and race, 

Unwasted by the lapse of years, 
Unchanged by changing place. 

From oldest time, on farthest shores, 

Beneath the pine or palm. 
One Unseen Presence she adores. 

With silence or with psalm. 

Her priests are all God's faithful sons, 
To serve the world raised up ; 

The pure in heart her baptized ones ; 
Love, her communion-cup. 

The truth is her prophetic gift. 

The soul her sacred page ; 
And feet on mercy's errands swift 

Do make her pilgrimage. 

O iiving Church ! thine errand speed. 

Fulfil thy task sublime ; 
With bread of life earth's hunger feed, — 

Redeem the evil time ! 

S. Longfellowi 



77 



All as God wilt 



All as God wills ! who wisely heeds 

To give or to withhold. 
And knoweth more of all my needs 

Than all my prayers have told. 

Enough, that blessings undeserved 
Have marked my erring track ; 

That, wheresoe'er my feet have swerved. 
Thy chastening turned me back ; 

That more and more a providence 

Of love is understood. 
Making the springs of time and sense 

Bright with eternal good ; 

That death seems but a covered way 

Which opens into light, 
Wherein no blinded child can stray 

Beyond the Father's sight. 

No longer forward or behind 

I look, in hope or fear, 
But grateful take the good I find, 

God's blessing now and here 



Whittier 



34 



78 



Yet Speaketh 



Immortal by their deed and word, 
Like light around them shed, 

Still speak the prophets of the Lord, 
Still live the sainted dead. 

The voice of old by Jordan's flood 

Yet floats upon the air : 
We hear it in beatitude, 

In parable and prayer. 

And still the beauty of that life 
Shines star-like on our way, 

And breathes its calm amid the strife 
And burden of to-day. 

Earnest of life forevermore, 

That life of duty here, — 
The trust that in the darkest hour 

Looked forth and knew no fear. 

Spirit of Jesus, still speed on ! 

Speed on thy conquering way. 
Till every lieart the Father own. 

And all his will obey. 



F. L. Hosn 



79 



The Indwelling God 



Oh, not in far-off realms of space. 
The spirit hath its throne : 

In every heart, it findeth place. 
And waiteth to be known. 

Thought answereth alone to thought. 
And soul with soul hath kin : 

The outward God he findeth not 
Who finds not God within. 



And if the vision come to thee, 

Revealed by inward sign. 
Earth will be full of Deity, 

And with his glory shine. 

Thou shalt not wait for company. 

Nor pitch thy tent alone : 
The indwelling God will go with thee, 

And show thee of his own. 

O gift of gifts, O grace of grace ! 

That God should condescend 
To make thy heart his dwelling-place. 

And be thy daily friend ! 

F. L. Hosmer 



80 



Prayer 



Father, we would not dare to change 

Thy purpose, if we might ; 
For how shall man presume to teach 

The everlasting Right? 

No word of ours can make thee wise 

Or better than thou art ; 
And yet we lift our souls to thee 

For what thou canst impart. 

Our prayer is but a flower that lifts 

Its petals to the sun, 
That in the light it may unfold 

Its leaflets one by one. 

We only ask thyself; that we. 

Unfolding hour by hour 
The beauty of good deeds, may drink 

Thy life in like the flower. 

M. J. s. 



35 



AULD LANG SYNE 



C. M. Double 




8i 



Auld Lang Syne 



Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And never brought to mind? 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days of auld lang syne? 
For auld lang syne we meet to-night. 

For auld lang syne, 
To sing the songs our fathers sang 

In days of auld lang syne. 

We've passed through many varied 
scenes. 

Since youth's unclouded day; 
And friends and hopes and happy 
dreams 

Time's hand hath swept away ; 
And voices that once joined with ours, 

In days of auld lang syne. 
Are silent now, and blend no mere 

In songs of auld lang syne. 

But when we cross the sea of life. 
And reach the heavenly shore. 

We'll sing the songs our fathers sing. 
Transcending those of yore : 



We'll meet to sing diviner strains 
Than those of auld lang syne, — 

Immortal songs of praise, unknown 
In days of auld lang syne. 



Anon 



82 



Song of the Silent Ones 



It singeth low in every heart. 

We hear it each and all, — 
A song of those who answer not. 

However we may call. 
They throng the silence of the breast ; 

We see them as of yore, — 
The kind, the true, the brave, the sweet. 

Who walk with us no more. 

'Tis hard to take the burden up, 

When these have laid it down : 
They brightened all the joy of life, 

They softened every frown. 
But, oh! 'tis good to think of them 

When we are troubled sore ; 
Thanks be to God that such have been, 

Although they are no more ! 



36 



More homelike seems the vast unknown, ' 

Since they have entered there ; 
To foUoAV them were not so hard, 

Wherever they may fare. 
They cannot be where God is not, 

On any sea or shore. 
Whate'er betides, thy love abides. 

Our God, for evermore! 

John \V. Chadwick 



83 



Summer Days 



The summer days are come again ; 

Once more, the glad earth yields 
Her golden wealth of ripening grain, 

And breath of clover-fields ; 
And deepening shade of summer woods, 

And glow of summer air. 
And Avinging thoughts, and happy v/ords 

Of love and joy and prayer. 

The summer days are come again. 

The birds are on the wing; 
God's praises, in their loving strain, 

Unconsciously they sing. 
We know who giveth all the good 

That doth our cup o'erbrim : 
For summer joy in field and wood. 

We lift our song to Him. 

S. Longfellow 



84 



Serving Man 



The cattle on a thousand hills 

With all their flocks are thine ; 
The corn that waves in every vale, 

Tlie grape and all its wine. 
We cannot minister to Thee 

Who everything dost own : 
Our duty we can only pay 

By serving man alone. 



To teach the world's dark ignorance, 

To lift up those that fall, 
To cheer the sad, and stoop to hear 

The needy Avhen they call, — 
This is an offering worthy God, 

A sacrifice divine. 
With hearts and hands made holy thus, 

We may approach his shrine. 



M. J. s. 



85 



Heroic Memories 



We'll sing our loving trust in God, 

However dark the day ; 
For sure 'tis he who leadeth us 

Along our changeful way. 
There cometh sun, tliere cometh cloud; 

But, whate'er may befall, 
We still will follow after him 

Who leads us through them all. 

Y>^e'll cheer our hearts, as on we go, 

With thoughts of those of old, 
Who through their furnace-trials came 

Refined like precious gold. 
Like Jesus, they, too, stood for truth, 

Though heretic with men ; 
Like him, they triumphed, though they 
died, 

And still they live again. 

Xot only in the far-off lands 

And far-off times they wrought : 
The modern world has heroes too 

To hft its heart and thought. 
These are the ones who dare to think; 

And, spite of hostile wrath, 
They, for the progress of mankind. 

Hew out a grander path. 

M. J. s. 



37 



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Nature* s Worship 



The harp at Nature's advent strung 

Has never ceased to play ; 
The song the stars of morning sung 

Has never died away. 

The green earth sends her incense up 
From many a mountain shrine ; 

From folded leaf and dewy cup, 
She pours her sacred wine. 

The blue sky is the temple's arch ; 

Its transept, earth and air ; 
The music of its starry march. 

The chorus of a prayer. 

So Nature keeps the reverent frame 
With which her years began. 

And all her signs and voices shame 
The prayerless heart of man. 

J. G, Whittier 



87 



Who is thy Neighbor 



Who is thy neighbor ? He whom thou 

Hast power to aid or bless ; 
Whose aching heart or burning brow 

Thy soothing hand may press. 

Thy neighbor? 'Tis the fainting poor, 
Whose eye with want is dim : 

Oh, enter thou his humble door. 
With aid and peace for him ! 

Thy neighbor? He Avho drinks the cup 
When sorrow drowns the brim. 

With words of high, sustaining hope, 
Go thou and comfort him. 

Thy neighbor? Pass no mourner by. 

Perhaps thou canst redeem 
A breaking heart from misery : 

Go share thy lot with him. 



Peahody 



38 



OO Walk in the Light 

Walk. in the liglit ! so shalt thou know 

That fellowship of love 
His Spirit only can bestow, 

Who reigns in liglit above. 

Walk in the light ! and thou shalt find 

Thy heart made truly his, 
Who dwells in cloudless light enshrined, 

In whom no darkness is. 

Walk in the light ! and thou shalt own 

Thy darkness passed away ; 
Because that light hath on thee shone. 

In which is perfect day. 

Walk in the light ! and thine shall be 
A path, though thorny, bright; 

For God, by grace, shall dwell in thee, 
And God himself is light. 

Bernard Barton 



89 



A New Year 



Our Father, through the coming year 
We know not what shall be ; 

But we w^ould leave, without a fear, 
Its ordering all to thee. 

It may be we shall toil in vain 
For what the world holds fair; 

And all its good we thought to gain 
Deceive, and prove but care. 

It may be it shall bring us days 
And nights of lingering pain. 

And bid us take our farewell gaze 
Of these loved haunts of men. 

But calmly. Lord, on thee we rest : 
No fears our trust shall move ; 

Thou knowest what for each is best ; 
And thou art perfect love. 

Gaskell 



UCl Kindly Judgment 

Think gently of the erring one : 

Oh, let us not forget, 
However darkly stained by sin, 

He is our brother yet ! 

Heir of the same inheritance. 
Child of the self-same God, 

He hath but fallen in the path 
We have in weakness trod. 

Speak gently to the erring ones : 
We may yet lead them back. 

With holy words and tones of love, 
From misery's thorny track. 

Forget not, brother, thou hast sinned, 

And sinful yet may'st be : 

Deal gently with the erring heart. 

As God hath dealt with thee. 

Miss Fletcher 

UX / will sing of thy Power and thy Mercy 

Our Father, God ! thy gracious power 

On every hand we see : 
Oh, may the blessings of each hour 

Lead all our thoughts to thee ! 

If, on the wings of morn, we sj^eed 

To earth's remotest bound. 
Thy hand will there our footsteps lead, 

Thy love our path surround. 

Thy power is in the ocean deeps. 

And reaches to the skies ; 
Thine eye of mercy never sleeps, 

Thy goodness never dies. 

In all the varying scenes of time, 
On thee our hopes depend, — 

Through every age, in every clime. 
Our Father and our friend ! 

James Thomson 



39 



NAOMI C. M. 



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^ Thankful Heart 



92 

Father, whate'er of earthly bliss 

Thy sovereign hand denies, 
Accepted at thy throne of grace, 

Let this petition rise : 

Give me a calm, a thankful heart. 

From every murmur free ; 
The blessings of thy grace impart, 

And make me live to thee. 

Let the sweet thought that thou art mine 

My life and death attend ; 
Thy presence through my journey shine, 

And crown my journey's end. 

Anne Steele 
U^ Jesus of Nazareth 

The loving Friend to all who bowed 

Beneath life's weary load. 
From lips baptized in humble prayer 

His consolations flowed. 

The faithful Witness to the Truth, 

His just rebuke was hurled 
Out from a heart that burned to break 

The fetters of the world. 



No hollow rite, no lifeless creed. 

His piercing glance could bear ; 
But longing hearts which sought him 
found 
That God and heaven were there. 

S. Longfellow 

Qo. Leading the Way 

Another hand is beckoning us. 

Another call is given ; 
And glows once more with angel steps 

The path that leads to heaven. 

Oh, half we deemed she needed not 
The changing of her sphere. 

To give to heaven a shining one, 
Who walked an angel here ! 

Unto our Father's will alone 
One thought hath reconciled, — 

That he whose love exceedeth ours 
Hath taken home his child. 

Fold her, O Father, in thine arms, 

And let her henceforth be 
A messenger of love between 

Our human hearts and thee. 



40 



Still, let her mild rebuking stand | Unto the hopes by sorrow crushed, 

Between us and the wrong, | A noble faith succeeds ; 

And her dear memory serve to make ! And life, by trials furrowed, bears 

Our faith in goodness strong. , The fruit of loving deeds. 

Whittier 



95 



Death of the Righteous 



leaf 



Behold the western evening light ! 

It melts in deepening gloom : 
So calm the righteous sink away, 

Descending to the tomb. 

The winds breathe low ; the yellow 
Scarce whispers from the tree : 

So gently flows the parting breath. 
When good men cease to be. 

How beautiful, on all the hills. 
The crimson light is shed ! 

'Tis like the peace the dying gives 
To mourners round his bed. 



How mildly, on the wandering cloud, 

The sunset beam is cast ! 
So sweet the memory left behind, 

When loved ones breathe their last. 

And, lo ! above the dews of night 

The vesper star api^ears : 
So faith lights up the mourner's heart 

Whose eyes are dim with tears. 

William B. 0. Peahody 



How rich, how sweet, how full of 
strength 

Our human spirits are. 
Baptized into the sanctities 

Of suffering and of prayer ! 

Yes, heavenly wisdom, love divine. 
Breathed through the lips which said, 

" Oh, blessed are the hearts that mourn : 
They shall be comforted." 

William H. Burleigh 



97 



96 



^Blessed are they that mourn^ 



From lips divine, like healing balm 
To hearts oppressed and torn, 

The heavenly consolation fell, 
"Blessed are they that mourn." 



All Truth leads to God 



Father, by whatsoever light 

Our path of life we see. 
It matters not, so at the last 

It leadeth us to thee. 

We thank thee for the star that rose 

O'er old Judea bright ; 
And that its deathless ray still shines, 

To fill our souls with light. 

We thank thee, too, that other stars 
O'er other lands have shone. 

To guide the stumbling feet of those 
Who toward thee struggle on. 

Thou, many names of saving power, 

Hast given unto men ; 
And each new truth that lifts the world 

Is God come down again. 

M. J. s. 



41 



ST. MARTIN'S CM. 



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Another Year 



Ais^OTHER year of setting suns, 

Of stars by night revealed, 
Of springing grass, of tender buds 

By winter's snow concealed. 

Another year of summer's glow, 
Of autumn's gold and brown. 

Of waving fields, and ruddy fruit 
The branches weighing down. 

Another year of happy work 

That better is than play ; 
Of simple cares, and love that grows 

More sweet from day to day. 

Another year of baby mirth. 
And childhood's blessed ways ; 

Of thinker's thought, and prophet's 
And poet's tender lays. [dream, 

Another year at Beauty's feast. 

At every moment spread ; 
Of silent hours, when grow distinct 

The voices of the dead. 



Another year to follow hard 
Where better souls have trod ; 

Another year of life's delight ; 
Another year of God ! 



J, W. Chadwick 



99 



Thy Kingdom come 



O God, the darkness roll away, 
Which clouds the human soul; 

And let the bright, the perfect day 
Speed onward to its goal. 

Let every hateful passion die. 
Which makes of brethren foes ; 

And war no longer raise its cry 
To mar the world's repose. 

Let faith and hope and charity 
Go forth through all the earth ; 

And man, in heavenly bearing, be 
True to his heavenly birth. 

Yea, let thy glorious kingdom come, 

Of holiness and love ; 
And make this world a portal meet 

For thy bright courts above. 

William Gaskell 



42 



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Xv-lvJ Spring 

The softened mould is brown and warm, 

The early blossoms break, 
And loosened streams along their banks 

A mossy verdure make, 

A dewy light broods o'er the earth, 

A sweetness new and rare, 
And tumults of brook, bird, and breeze 

With music wake the air. 

Awake, O liearti awake and learn 

Tlie secret of the spring I 
From winter-sleep it comes like light, 

Or as a bird on Aving. 

And if I shall be winter-locked. 

As sometime I may be ; 
If bitter storms and freezing snows 

Come whirling down on me, — 

Let me lie patient, like the earth. 

And say, "This sliall be rest " ; i 

And then, O Lord I at thy dear call ! 

Arise renewed and blest. i 

J. V. Blake ' 



lOI 



Asst/red 



I LOXG for household voices gone, 
For vanished smiles, I long ; 

But God hath led my dear ones on, 
And he can do no wrong. 

I know not what the future hath 

Of marvel and surprise. 
Assured alone that life and death 

His mercy underlies. 

And, if my heart and flesh are weak 

To bear an untried pain. 
The bruised reed he will not break, 

But strengthen and sustain. 

I know not where his islands lift 
Their fronded palms in air; 

I only know I cannot drift 
Beyond his love and care. 

And so beside the Silent Sea 

I wait the muflied oar : 
Xo liarm from him can come to me 

On ocean or on shore. 

J. G. Whittier 



43 



MANOAH C. M. 






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one life thrilled the star-dust 
through, 
In nebulous masses whirled, 
Until, globed like a drop of dew, 
Shone out a new-made world. 

The one life on the ocean shore, 
Through primal ooze and slime, 

Crept slowly on from less to more 
Along the ways of time. 

Tlie one life in the jungles old, 
From lowly, creeping things. 

Did ever some new form unfold, — 
Swift feet or soaring wings. 

The one life all the ages through 

Pursued its wondrous plan. 
Till, as the tree of promise grew, 

It blossomed into man. 

The one life reacheth onward still : 
As yet, no eye may see 



The far-off fact man's dream fulfil, — 
The glory yet to be. 

M. J. s. 

103 Hope 

Standin'g upon the mountain top, 
We catch the kindling ray 

That reddens in the east, and tells 
The coming of the day. 

The valleys all in shadow lie, 

And dark is every plain : 
It seems as if the world's long night 

Would never cease its reign. 

But when the eastern hill-tops glow. 
We know the night is past ; 

And, though the valleys still are dark. 
The day must come at last. 

Thus Hope her cheering lesson reads 

In every dawn of day : 
How slow soe'er the shadows lift. 

The night must pass away. 

M. J. s. 



44 



V^OODSTOCK C. M. 



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xU^ The Manifold Grace of God 

Tiiou Grace divine, encircling all, 

A shoreless, soundless sea, 
Wherein at last our souls must fall, — 

O love of God most free ! 

When over dizzy heights we go, 
One soft hand blinds our eyes, 

The other leads us safe and slow, — 
O love of God most wise ! 

And though we turn us from thy face, 
And wander wide and long. 

Thou hold'st us still in thine embrace, — 
O love of God most strong ! 

The saddened heart, the restless soul, 
The toil-worn frame and mind. 

Alike confess thy sweet control, — 
O love of God most kind ! 

And, filled and quickened by thy breath. 
Our souls are strong: and free 



To rise o'er sin and fear and death, 
O love of God, to thee ! 



Eliza Scudder 



105 



Aspiration 



The dove, let loose in eastern skies. 

Returning fondly home, 
Ne'er stoops to earth her wing, nor flies 

Where idle warblers roam. 

But high she shoots through air and light, 

Above all low delay. 
Where nothing earthly bounds her flight, 

Xor shadow dims her way. 

So grant me. Lord, from every snare 

Of sinful passion free. 
Aloft, through faith's serener air, 

To urge my course to thee ; 

No sin to cloud, no lure to stay 
My soul, as home she springs, — 

Thy sunshine on her joyful way, 
Thv freedom on her wings. 



T. Moore 



45 



BARB Y C. M. 




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Man frailj and God eternal 



O God, our help in ages past, 
Our hope for years to come, 

Our shelter from the stormy blast, 
And our eternal home, — 

Before the hills in order stood, 
Or earth received her frame, 

From everlasting thou art God, 
To endless years the same. 

A thousand ages, in thy sight, 

Are like an evening gone ; 
Short as the watch that ends the night, 

Before the rising sun. 

Time, like an ever-rolling stream 

Bears all its sons away ; 
They fly, forgotten, as a dream 

Dies at the opening day. 



O God, our help in ages past. 
Our hope for years to come, 



Be thou our guard while troubles last, 

And our eternal home ! 

Isaac Watts 



107 



46 



The Ways of Wisdom 

Wisdom has treasures greater far 

Than east or west unfold, 
And her rewards more precious are 

Than is the gain of gold. 

In her right hand she holds to view 

A length of happy years. 
And in her left the prize of fame 

And honor bright appears. 

She guides the young with innocence 
In pleasure's path to tread, 

A crown of glory she bestows 
Upon the hoary head. 

According as her labors rise, 

So her rewards increase : 
Her ways are ways of pleasantness. 

And all her paths are peace. 

Scotch Paraphrased 



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109 



Consecration 



The heavens cannot contain thee, Lord ; q ^.^^^ ^^,^^^^ ^^^ j^ j,^ ^j^^ ^j^^^ 
And shall we think to raise 



Fit dwelling for thy living word 
Or worthy of thy praise? 

Shall walls of wood or stone, reared 
higli, 

Look noble in thy sight ? 
Or lofty spire that cleaves the sky 

Touch heaven with delight? 

Nay, these are senseless ! thou wouldst 
have 

A temple built of men, 
Compact w^ith deeds that seek to save 

And lift to God again. 

The utmost truth of God and man 

Shall be our corner-stone ; 
And rising walls unfold a plan 

That Love may call her own. 

Thus may thy holy church arise. 

Until the structure fair 
Shall fill the earth and touch the skies. 

And heaven be everywhere. 

M. J. s. 



Whose light is on the sea, 

Who livest in the human heart, 

We give ourselves to thee. 

In fearless, world-wide search for truth, 

Whatever form it wear. 
Or crown or cross or fame or blame, 

We thine ourselves declare. 

In love that binds mankind in one. 
That serves all those in need. 

Whose law is helpful sympathy, — 
In this we're thine indeed. 

In labor, whose far-distant end 

Is bringing to accord 
The real fact w^ith highest hope, 

We follow thee, O Lord ! 

To truth, to love, to duty, then, 

Wherever we may be, 
We give ourselves ! and, doing this. 

We give ourselves to thee. 

M. J. S. 



47 



L ABAN S. M. 



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If, on a quiet sea, 
Toward heaven we calmly sail, 
With grateful hearts, O God ! to thee 
We owe the favoring gale. 

But should the surges rise. 
And rest delay to come, 
Blest be the sorrow, kind the storm. 
Which drives us nearer home ! 

Soon shall our doubts and fears 
All yield to thy control; 
Thy tender mercies shall illume 
The midnight of the soul. 

Teach us in every state 
To make thy will our own. 
And, when the joys of sense dej^art, 
To live by faith alone. 



Anon 



III 



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The Sower 



Sow IN the morn thy seed. 
At eve hold not thy hand ; 
To doubt and fear, give thou no heed. 
Broadcast it o'er the land ! 



Beside all waters sow. 
The highway furrows stock. 
Drop it where thorns and thistles grow, 
Scatter it on the rock! 

And duly shall apjDcar, 
In verdure, beauty, strength. 
The tender blade, the stalk, the ear, 
And the full corn at length. 

James Montgomery 



112 



Heaven Everywhere 



48 



Our heaven is everywhere, 
If we but love the Lord, 
Unswerving tread the narrow way, 
And ever shun the broad. 

'Tis where the trusting heart 
Bows meekly to its grief, 
Still looking up with earnest faith 
For comfort and relief. 

Wherever truth abides, 
Sweet peace is ever there : 
If we but love and serve the Lord, 
Our heaven is everywhere. 



BOYLSTON S. M. 



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The Lord's Prayer 



OuK heavenly Father, hear 
The prayer we offer now ! 
Thy name be hallowed far and near, 
To thee, all nations bow. 

Thy kingdom come ; thy will 
On earth be done in love. 
As saints and seraphim fulfil 
Thy perfect law above. 

Our daily bread supj^ly, 
While by thy word we live ; 
The guilt of our iniquity 
Forgive as we forgive. 

From dark temptation's power 
Our feeble hearts defend ; 
Deliver in the evil hour. 
And guide us to the end. 

Thine, then, for ever be 
Glory and power divine ! 
The sceptre, throne, and majesty 
Of heaven and earth are thine. 

James Montgomery 



49 



II^ The Right is the Beautiful 

Teach me, my God and King, 
Thy will in all to see, 
And what I do in anything 
To do it as for thee I 

To scorn the senses' sway, 
While still to thee I tend. 
In all I do be thou the way. 
In all be thou the end. 

All may of thee partake * 
Nothing so small can be 
But draws, when acted for thy sake, 
Greatness and worth from thee. 

A servant with this clause 
Makes drudgery divine : 
Who sweeps a room as for thy laws 
Makes that and th' action fine. 

This is tlie famous stone 
That turneth all to gold ; 
For that which God doth touch and own 
Cannot for less be told. 

George rierhert 



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XX S The Lord sha I lead me 

Thy way, not mine, O Lord ! 
However dark it be : 
Lead me aright by thine own hand, 
Choose out the path for me. 

Smooth let it be or rough. 
It Avill be still the best ; 
Winding or straight, it matters not, 
It leads me to thy rest. 

I dare not choose my lot ; 
I would not if I might : 
Choose thou the way for me, my God. 
So shall I walk aright. 

Not mine, not mine the choice 
In things or great or small : 
Be thou my light, my guide, my strength. 
My wisdom, and my all. 

Bonar 
110 "Thy Kingdom Come" 

Come, kingdom of our God, 
Sweet reign of light and love, 
Shed peace and hope and joy abroad. 
And wisdom from above. 



Over our spirits first 
Extend thy healing reign : 
There raise and quench the sacred thirst 
That never pains again. 

Come, kingdom of our God, 
And make the broad earth thine ; 
Stretch o'er her lands and isles the rod 
That flowers with grace divine. 

Soon may all tribes be blest 

With fruit from life's glad tree. 

And in its shade like brothers rest. 

Sons of one family. 

Johns 

11*7 *'It is nigh Thee, in thy Heart " 

Say not the law divine 
Is hidden far from thee : 
That heavenly law within may shine. 
And there its brightness be. 

Soar not, my soul, on higli, 

To bring it down to earth : 

No star within the vaulted sky 

Is of such priceless worth. 



50 



OLMUTZ S. M. 



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Thou need'st not launch thy l)ark 
Upon a shoreless sea, 
Breasting its waves to find the ark, 
To bring this dove to thee. 

Cease, then, my soul, to roam ; 
Thy wanderings all are vain : 
That holy word is found at home. 
Within thy heart its reign. 



Let Love and Truth alone 
Hold human hearts in thrall. 
That Heaven its work at length may own. 
And men be brothers all. 

Johns 



119 



The True Fast 



Barton 



118 



Brotherhood 



Hush the loud cannon's roar. 
The frantic warrior's call ! [gore ? 
Why should the earth be drenched with 
Are we not brothers all ? 

Want, from the wretch depart ! 
Chains, from the captive fall! 
Sweet Mercy, melt the oppressor's heart 
Sufferers are brothers all. 

Churches and sects, strike down 
Each mean partition-wall ! 
Let Love each harsher feeling drown ; 
For men are brothers all. 



" Is THIS a fast for me ? " 
Thus saith the Lord our God : 

"A day for man to vex his soul, 
And feel affliction's rod? 

"No: is not this alone 
The sacred fast I choose, — 

Oppression's yoke to burst in twain, 
The bands of guilt unloose ? 

'• To nakedness and want. 
Your food and raiment deal ; 

To dwell your kindred race among, 
And all their sufferings heal ? 

" Then, like the morning ray, 

Shall spring your health and light : 
Before you, rigliteousness shall shine ; 
Behind, my glory bright." 

Drum man (I 



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X20 The Pilgrim Fathers 

The breaking waves dashed high 

On a stern and rock-bound coast ; 
And the woods against a stormy sky 

Their giant branches tossed ; 
And the heavy night hung dark 

The hills and waters o'er, — 
When a band of exiles moored their 
bark 

On the wild New England shore, 

Not as the conqueror comes, 

They, the true-hearted, came ; 
Not with the roll of stirring drums, 

And the trump that sings of fame : 
Not as the flying come, 

In silence and in fear : 
They shook the depths of the desert's 
gloom 

With their hymns of lofty cheer. 



Amidst the storm they sang : 

And the stars heard, and the sea ; 
And the sounding aisles of the dim wood 
rang 

With the anthem of the free. 
The ocean eagle soared [foam. 

From his nest by the white wave's 
And the rocking pines of the forest 
roared, — 

This was their welcome home ! 

What sought they thus afar, — 

Bright jewels of the mine. 
The wealth of seas, the spoils of war? 

They sought a faith's pure shrine. 
Ay, call it holy ground, — 

The soil where first they trod : 

They have left unstained what there they 

found, — 

Freedom to worship God. 

M?'S. Hemans 



52 



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'* Happy New Year' 



Backwakd looking o'er the past, 
Forward, too, with eager gaze. 
Stand we here to-day, O God ! 
At the parting of the ways. 

Tenderest thoiiglits our bosoms fill; 
Memories all bright and fair 
Seem to float on spirit-wings 
Downward through the silent air. 

Hark ! through all their music sweet, 
Hear you not a voice of cheer ? 
'Tis the voice of Hope which sings, 
" Happy be the coming year ! " 

Father, comes that voice from thee ! 
Swells it with thy meaning vast, — 
Good in all thy future stored, 
Fairer than in all the past ! 

J. \V. Chadwick 



122 



The Eternal Lights 



Slowly, by God's hand unfurled, 
Down around the weary world. 
Falls the darkness ; oh, how still 
Is the workinsr of his will ! 



Mighty Spirit, ever nigh. 
Work in me as silently ; 
Veil the day's distracting sights. 
Show me heaven's eternal lights. 

Living stars to view be brought 
In the boundless realms of thought ; 
High and infinite desires, 
Flaming like those upper fires. 

Holy Truth, Eternal Riglit, 
Let them break upon my sight ; 
Let tliem shine serene and still. 
And with light my being fill ! 

Purness 



53 



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JL^^ Heredity 

Heir of all the ages, I, — 

Heir of all that they have wrought ! 

All their store of emprise high, 

All their wealth of precious thought ! 

Every golden deed of theirs 
Sheds its lustre on my way ; 
All their labors, all their j)rayers, 
Sanctify this present day. 

Heir of all that they have earned 
By their j^assion and their tears; 
Heir of all that they have learned 
Through the weary, toiling years ; 

Heir of all the faith sublime 

On wliose wings tliey soared to heaven; 

Heir of every hope that Time 

To earth's fainting sons hath given ; 

As]>irations pure and high ; 
Strength to do and to endure ; 
Heir of all the ages, I, — 
Lo, I am no longer poor ! 

Julia C. R. Dorr 



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1.^lL In Common Things 

In each breeze that wanders free, 
In each flower that gems the sod, 
Living souls may hear and see 
Freshly uttered words from God. 

Had we but a searching mind. 
Seeking good where'er it springs. 
We should then true wisdom find 
Hidden in familiar things. 

God is present and doth shine 
Through each scene beneath the sky. 
Kindling with a light divine 
Every form that meets the eye. 

Worlds on worlds in phalanx deep 
Need we not to prove him here : 
Daisies, fresh from nature's sleep. 
Tell of him in lines as clear. 

If the mind would Nature see. 
Let her cherish Virtue more : 
Goodness bears the golden key 
That unlocks her temple door. 

Mrs. Wnterston 



54 



SOLITUDE 




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12 S The Builders 

All are architects of Fate, 
Working in these walls of Time : 
Some with massive deeds and great, 
Some Avith ornaments of rhyme. 



Nothing useless is or low : 
Each thing in its place is best ; 
And what seems but idle show 
Strengthens and supports the rest. 

For the structure that we raise. 
Time is with materials filled : 
Our to-days and yesterdays 
Are the blocks with which we build. 



Build to-day, tlien, strong and sure, 
With a firm and ample base ; 
And ascending and secure 
Shall to-morrow find its place. 

Longfellow 



126 



Education 



Learxers are we all at school, 
Eager youth and weary age, 
Goyerned by the self-same rule, 
Poring o'er the self-same page. 

Life the lesson that we learn 
As the days and years go by ; 
Wondrous are the leaves we turn 
On the earth and in the sky. 

Oft our sight with tears is blurred 
While we strive in vain to tell 
What may mean some harder word 
Than our wisdom yet can spell. 

But we read enough to trust 
That our grand hopes are iu)t .ies, 
That our hearts are more than dust, 
And our homes are in the skies. 

M. J. s. 



55 



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Thou, whose name is blazoned forth 
On our banner's gleaming fold, 
Freedom ! all thy sacred Avorth 
Never yet has half been told. 

But to-day we sing of one 
Older, graver far than thou ; 
With the seal of time begun 
Stamped upon her awful brow. 

She is Duty : in her hand 
Is a sceptre heaven-brought ; 
Hers the accent of command, 
Hers the dreadful, mystic Ought, 

But her bondage is so sweet ! 
And her burdens make us strong : 
Win^^s they seem to weary feet, 
Laughter to our lips, and song. 

Wheresoever slie may lead. 
Freshly burdened every day, 



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In her ever brightening way ! 

J, W. Chadwick 



128 



"Give us our Daily Bread' 



Day by day, the manna fell : 
Oh, to learn this lesson well ! 
Still by constant mercy fed. 
Give me, Lord, my daily bread. 

Day by day, the promise reads, — 
"Daily strength for daily needs : 
Cast foreboding fears away ; 
Take the manna of to-day." 

Lord, my times are in thy hand : 
All my sanguine hopes have planned 
To thy wisdom I resign. 
And would mould my will to thine. 

Thou my daily task shalt give ; 
Day by day to thee I live : 
So shall added years fulfil 
Not my own, my Father's will. 

J OS i ah Conder 



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Struggle 



There's a strife we all must wage, 
From life's entrance to its close ; 
Blest the bold who dare engage ! 
Woe for him who seeks repose ! 

Honored they who firmly stand 
While the conflict presses round, 
God's own banner in their hand. 
In his service faithful found. 



1^0 Inspiration 

Life of Ages, richly poured, 
Love of God, unspent and free. 
Flowing m the prophet's word 
And the people's liberty! 

Never was to chosen race 
That unstinted tide confined : 
Thine is every time and place. 
Fountain sweet of heart and mind! 



What our foes ? Each thought impure, Breathing in the thinker's creed, 
Passions fierce that tear the soul. Pulsing in the hero's blood. 



Every ill that we can cure. 
Every crime we can control. 

Every suffering which our hand 
Can Avith soothing care assuage, 
Every evil of our land. 
Every error of our age. 

On, then, to the glorious field! 
He Avho dies his life shall save: 
God himself shall be our shield. 
He shall bless and crown the brave. 

Buljinch 



Nerving simplest thought and deed, 
Freshening time with truth and good, 

Consecrating art and song, 
Holy book and pilgrim track. 
Hurling^ floods of tvrant wrons: 
From the sacred limits back, — 

Life of Ages, richly poured, 

Love of God, unspent and free, ' 

Flow still in the prophet's word 

And the ])eople's liberty ! 

S. Johnson 



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Beauty for Ashes 



Leaf by leaf the roses fall, 
Drop by drojD the springs run dry, 
One by one, beyond recall, 
Summer beauties fade and die. 
But the roses bloom again. 
And the springs will gush anew. 
In the pleasant April rain 
And the summer sun and dew. 

So, in hours of deepest gloom. 
When tlie springs of gladness fail. 
And the roses in their bloom 
Droop like maidens wan and pale, 
We shall find some hope that lies 
Like a silent germ apart. 
Hidden far from careless eyes 
In the garden of the heart ; 

Some sweet hope, to gladness wed. 
That will spring afresh and new 
When griefs winter shall have fled. 
Giving place to sun and dew ; 



Some sweet hope that breathes of spring 
Through the weary, weary time, 
Budding forth its blossoming 
In the spirit's silent clime. 



Howe 
I^^ Social Love 

When the truth shall lead us home, 
When we to its temple come. 
Then we shall its goodness prove. 
As the only source of love. 
Hither all your music bring ; 
Strike aloud its cheerful string : 
Mortals join, the truth approve, — 
Join to hail the Source of Love. 

Old and young, your voices raise ; 
Tune your lips in social praise ; 
Strike the notes upon the lyre : 
All to happiness aspire. 
Cease contention, discord, strife ; 
Lessen all the cares of life : 
Virtue ne'er can disapprove 
Cordial hearts of social love. 



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I^^ 0/1 the Watch-Tower 

Watchmax, tell us of the night, — 
What its signs of promise are. 
Traveller, o'er yon mountain's height, 
See that glory-beaming star ! 
Watchman, does its beauteous ray 
Aught of hope or joy foretell? 
Traveller, yes : it brings the day, — 
Promised day of Israel. 

Watchman, tell us of the night : 
Higher yet that star ascends. 
Traveller, blessedness and light, I 

Peace and truth, its course j^ortends. 
Watchman, will its beams alone 
Gild tlie spot that gave them birth ? 
Traveller, ages are its own : 
See ! it bursts o'er all the earth. 

Watchman, tell us of the night ; 
For the morning seems to dawn. 
Traveller, darkness takes its flight, | 
Doubt and terror are withdrawn. ' 



Watchman, let thy wanderings cease : 
Hie thee to thy quiet home. 
Traveller, lo ! the Prince of Peace, 
Lo ! the Son of God is come. 

Bowring 



134 



The Offering 



50 



Lord, what offering shall we bring 
At thine altars when we bow ? 
Hearts, the pure, unsullied spring 
Whence the kind affections flow ; 
Quiet thoughts at peace with all ; 
Wrongs forgiven into rest ; 
Sympathy intent to call 
Sorrow from the wounded breast ; 

Willing hands to lead the blind. 
Bind the wounded, feed the poor ; 
Love, embracing all our kind, 
Charity, with liberal store. 
Teach us, O thou heavenly King ! 
Thus to sliow our grateful mind. 
Thus the accepted offering bring, — 
Love to thee and all mankind. 

John Taylor 



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X^S Seeking God 

Teach us, Father, how to find thee ! 

This the cry of all the earth. 
Search for God has built all altars ; 

Here have all religions birth. 

Lo how simple is the pathway ! 

God is never far to find ; 
Only be like him in helping, 

Serve and lift up all mankind. 

Pity sorrow, save the sinning. 
Lead the little feet, and see ! 

Helping like God, ye are godlike : 
God himself is found in thee. 

M. J. s. 



136 



God is Love 



God is love : his mercy brightens 
All the path in which we rove ; 

Bliss he wakes, and woe he lightens : 
God is wisdom, God is love. 

Chance and change are busy ever ; 

Man decays and ages move ; 
But his mercy waneth never : 

God is wisdom, God is love. 



E'en the hour that darkest seemeth 
Will his changeless goodness prove ; 

From the gloom his brightness stream- 
God is wisdom, God is love. [eth : 

He with earthly cares entwineth 

Hope and comfort from above ; 

Everywhere his glory shineth : 

God is wisdom, God is love. 

Bowring 

J-^V The Gentle Teacher 

Ever find I joy in reading, 

In the ancient holy Book, 
Of the gentle Teacher's pleading. 

Truth in every word and look. 

How, when children came, he blessed 
them. 

Suffered no man to reprove, 
Took them in his arms, and pressed them 

To his heart with words of love ; 

How to all the sick and tearful 
Help was ever gladly shown ; 

How he sought the poor and fearful, 
Called them brothers and his own; 



6a 



How no contrite soul e'er souglit him 

And was bidden to depart ; 
How with gentle words he taught him, 

Took the death from out his heart. 

Still I read the ancient story, 

And my joy is ever new, — 
How he lived so pure and holy, 

How he loved so firm and true. 

Luise Hensel (tr. by Cath. Winkworth) 



138 



Decoration Day 



We remember thee, O brave ones 
Who for truth and country bled ! 

And, though with us here no longer, 
Still we cannot think thee dead. 

Ye are living, though the grasses 
Green above your graves may be : 

Ye are living in the glory 
Of a people that is free ; 

Ye are livmg in the comrades 
That your faith and valor knew ; 

Ye shall live in all the future, 
While to right brave men are true. 

For no deed heroic faileth 
Ever from the hearts of men : 

Each new year it springeth upward. 
Young with endless life again. 

M. J. s. 



139 



The City of God 



Glorious things of thee are spoken, 

Zion, city of our God : 
He, whose word cannot be broken. 

Formed thee for his own abode. 

On the Rock of Ages founded. 
What can shake thy sure repose ? 



With salvation's walls surrounded, 
Thou mayst smile at all thy foes. 

See I the streams of living waters, 
Springing from eternal love. 

Well supply thy sons and daugliters, 
And all fear of want remove. 

Who can faint while such a river 
Ever flows their thirst to assuage ! 

Grace which, like the Lord the Giver, 
Never fails from ao^e to ag^e. 

J. Newton 



140 



The Conflict of Life 



Onward [onward], though the region 
AVhere thou art be drear and lone : 

God hath set a guardian legion 
Very near thee, — press thou on I 

By the thorn-road, and none other. 
Is the mount of vision won ; 

Tread it without shrinking, brother ! 
Jesus trod it, — press thou on ! 

By thy trustful, calm endeavor. 
Guiding, cheering, like the sun. 

Earth-bound hearts thou shalt deliver: 
Oh, for their sake, press thou on I 

Be this world the wiser, stronger. 
For thy life of pain and peace : 

While it needs thee, oh, no longer 
Pray thou for thy quick release. 

I Pray thou [every day the] rather 
That thou be a faithful son ; 
By the prayer of Jesus, — " Father, 
Not my will, but thine, be done ! " 

Samuel Johnson 



61 



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141 



Psalm of Life 



Tell me not in mournful numbers 
Life is but an empty dream ; 

For the soul is dead chat slumbers, 
And things are not Avhat they seem. 

Life is real, life is earnest. 

And the grave is not its goal : 

Dust thou art, to dust returnest, 
Was not spoken of the soul. 

Not enjoyment, and not sorrow, 
Is our destined end and way ; 

But to act, that each to-morrow 
Find us further than to-day. 

Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant ; 

Let the dead Past bury its dead : 
Act, act in the living Present, 

Heart within and God o'erhead. 

Let us, then, be up and doing. 

With a heart for any fate ! 
Still achieving, still pursuing. 

Learn to labor and to wait. 

Longfellow 



142 



Life's Work 



All around us, fair with flowers, 
Fields of sleeping beauty lie ; 

All around us clarion voices 
Call to duty stern and high. 

Thankfully we will rejoice in 
All the beauty God has given ; 

But beware it does not win us 

From the work ordained of heaven. 

Following every voice of mercy 
With a trusting, loving heart, 

Let us in life's earnest labor 
Still be sure to do our part. 

Now, to-day, and not to-morrow, 
Let us work with all our might, 

Lest the wretched faint and perish 
In the coming stormy night. 

Now, to-day, and not to-morrow. 
Lest, before to-morrow's sun. 

We, too, mournfully departing, 
Shall have left our work undone. 



62 



WILMOT 8 &73 




143 



One by One 



OxE by one the sands are flowing, 
One by one the moments fall : 

Some are coming, some are going ; 
Do not strive to grasp them all. 

One by one thy duties wait thee ; 

Let thy whole strength go to each ; 
Let no future dreams elate thee ; 

Learn thou first what these can teach. 

One by one, bright gifts from heaven, 
Joys are lent thee here below ; 

Take them readily when given ; 
Ready, too, to let them go. 

One by one thy griefs shall meet thee ; 

Do not fear an arm^d band : 
One will fade as others greet thee, — 

Shadows passing through the land. 

Every hour that fleets so slowly 

Has its task to do or bear ; 
Luminous the crown and holy, 

If thou set each gem with care. 

A. A. Procter 



144 



Work 



Work ! it is thy highest mission. 

Work ! all blessing centres there. 
Work for culture, for the vision 

Of the true and good and fair. 

'Tis of knowledge the condition. 
Opening still new fields beyond ; 

'Tis of thought the full fruition ; 
'Tis of love the perfect bond. 

Work I by labor comes th' unsealing 
Of the thoughts that in thee burn ; 

Comes in action the revealing 
Of the truths thou hast to learn. 

Work in helping, loving union 
With thy brethren of mankind : 

With the foremost hold communion, 
Succor those who toil behind. 

For true work can never perish, 
And thy followers in the way 

For thy works thy name shall cherish: 
Work while it is called to-day ! 

F. M. White 



63 



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145 



Step by Step 



Not so fearful, doubting pilgrim, 

Though the darkness round thee 
close, 

Though the future glooms foreboding, 
Threatening all thy soul's repose. 

'Tis not in this life vouchsafed us 

All our way to see before ; 
Clears the path as we go forward, 

Step by step, and nothing more. 

Noble ones have gone before thee : 
Fear not, while thine eyes may greet, 

Leading on, their faithful footprints ; 
In them strive to set thy feet. 

Wait not for the noonday brightness : 
Haste thee through the morning 
gi'ay; 

Lo, the eastern glow before thee. 

Broadening, brightening ray by ray ! 



Thus, the just one's day beginneth : 
First, the streak of dawn is given ; 

Earth sees but the early morning. 
Cloudless noon is found in heaven. 



M. J. s. 



146 



Call of the Age 



We are living, we are dwelling 
In a grand and awful time : 

In an age on ages telling. 
To be living is sublime. 

Will ye play, then, will ye dally 
With your music and your wine ? 

Up ! it is the Almighty's rally : 

God's own arm hath need of thine. 

On ! let all the soul within you 
For the Truth's sake go abroad 

Strike ! let every nerve and sinew 
Tell on ages, tell for God. 

A. C. Coxe 



64 



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147 



ZTe careth for us 



Yes, for me, for me He careth, 
With a father's tender care ; 

Yes, with me, with me he shareth 
Every burden, every fear. 



148 



Hope above Doubt 



Whex the gladsome day declineth, 
And around us falls the night, 

Still down through the darkness shineth 
Some fair star to tell of lig:ht. 



Yes, o'er me, o'er me he watcheth, Never is the dark so blinding 

Ceaseless watcheth, night and day; But outgleams some feeble ray, 
Yes, e'en me, e'en me he snatcheth"^ Ever our despair reminding 



From the perils of the way. 

Yes, in me abroad he sheddeth 
Joys unearthly, love and light ; 

And to cover me he spreadeth 
His paternal wing of might. 

Yes, in me, in me he dwelleth ; 

I in him, and he in me : 
And my empty soul he filleth. 

Here and through eternity. 



Bonar ' 



That somewhere is brightest day. 

Though we then, thro' shadow groping, 
Stumble on, we still may know — 

And our doubting change to hoping — 
Only light can shadow throw. 

So the night itself, that hideth 
From our eyes the sunny sky, 

Tells us that the light abideth,— 
For the stars still shine on high. 

M. J. S. 



GREENVILLE 



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149 



The Age-long Battle 



Up the pathway of the ages, 

From the dim land of the past, 
Come the sounds of battle-shouting, 

Armor-clang, and bugle-blast ; 
For our human race has ever [cloud, 

Marched through blood and under 
Tearing swaddling-bands for Freedom 

From the vanquished tyrant's shroud. 

And to-day the wide-winged armies 

Of the God who marshals all 
Sweep the earth, and cross the spaces 

Where the distant star-beams fall ; 
For the order of this battle. 

Waged for universal right, 
Grasps an age-long, age-wide progress 

Out of darkness up to light. 

Standing here as this day's sentries, 
Set to watch our little time. 

Let us hear the past and future 
Calling us to deeds sublime. 



Children of heroic fathers, 

We the future's sires must be ; 

And the coming generations 
Look to us to make them free. 

Let us hold our lines not only, — 

Hear the order to advance ! 
Grasp the shield of Faith not only, — 

Lift on high Truth's flaming lance ! 
Fight for every liope that's human. 

Fight to shatter every chain. 
Fight till every man and woman 

Owneth heart and soul and brain. 

By the Ancient's long endeavor, 

By the Honorable's fame. 
By our race and by our country. 

By each high and noble name. 
By the God of hosts who leads us. 

By the future's dawning light. 
Swear to stand and swear to struggle 

Till earth's might shall mean its right ! 

M. J. s. 



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151 



XKvJ Divine Love 

Love divine, all love excelling, 

Joy of heaven to earth come down. 
Fix in us thy humble dwelling, 

All thy faithful mercies crown. 
Father, thou art all compassion ; 

Pure, unbounded love thou art : 
Visit us with thy salvation. 

Enter every longing heart. 

Breathe, oh ! breathe thy loving spirit 

Into every troubled breast ; 
Let us all in theo iiiherit. 

Let us find thy promised rest. 
Come, almighty to deliver ! 

Let us all thy life receive ; 
Graciously come down, and never. 

Never more thy temples leave. 

Wesley's Col. 



Waiting for Death 



OxLY waiting till the shadows 

Are a little longer grown ; 
Only waiting till the glimmer 

Of the day's last beam is flown ; 
Till the light of earth is faded 

From the heart once full of day ; 
Till the stars of heaven are breaking 

Through the twilight soft and gray. 

Only waiting till the shadows 

Are a little longer grown ; 
Only Avaiting till the glimmer 

Of the day's last beam is flown. 
Then, from out the gathered darkness, 

Holy, deathless stars shall rise, 
By Avhose light my soul shall gladly 

Tread its pathway to the skies. 

Frances L. ^face 



U7 



HARWELL 8s & 7s Double 




1^2 The Word of the Lord ahideth forever 

God of ages and of nations ! 

Every race and every time 
Hath received thine inspirations, 

Glimpses of thy truth sublime. 
Ever spirits, in rapt vision, 

Passed the heavenly veil within ; 
Ever hearts, bowed in contrition, 

Found salvation from their sin. 

Reason's noble aspiration 

Truth in growing clearness saw ; 
Conscience spoke its condemnation. 

Or proclaimed the Eternal Law. 
While thine inward revelations 

Told thy saints their prayers were 
heard, 
Prophets to the guilty nations 

Spoke thine everlasting word. 

Lord, that word abideth ever : 

Revelation is not sealed. 
Answering unto man's endeavor, 

Truth and Right are still revealed. 
That which came to ancient sages, — 

Greek, Barljarian, Roman, Jew, — 
Written in the heart's deep pages. 

Shines to-day, forever new ! 

Samuel Longfellow 



i K ^ Christmas 

Now THE joyful Christmas morning, 

Breaking o'er the world below. 
Tells again the wondrous story 

Of the Christ-child long ago. 
Hark! we hear again the chorus 

Echoing through the starry sky ; 
And we join the heavenly anthem, 

" Glory be to God on high ! " 

Out of every clime and people. 

Under every holy name. 
Is the everlasting gospel 

Good and glad for aye the same : 
So we, in our happy Christmas, 

Breathe the universal creed, 
Clasj^ing hands with distant ages 

In a brotherhood indeed. 

Sing aloud, then, hearts and voices ! 

Shout, O new world, free and strong ! 
Hail of Light the deathless triumph. 

Join the old world's birthday song, — 
" Glory be to God the highest ! 

Peace on earth, good will to men ! " 
'Twas the morning stars that pealed it, 

Let the world respond again ! 

Mrs. M. N. Meijs 



68 



AUTUMN 83 & 78 



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154 



A Creed 

I BELIEVE ill Human Kindness 

Large amid the sons of men, 
Nobler far in willing blindness 

Than in censure's keenest ken. 
I believe in Self-Denial, 

And its secret throb of joy ; 
In the Love that lives through trial, 

Dying not, though death destroy. 

I believe in dreams of Duty, 

Warning us to self-control, — 
Foregleams of the glorious beauty 

That shall yet transform the soul ; 
I believe in Love renewing 

All that sin [e'er sweeps] away, 
Leaven-like its Avork pursuing 

Xight by night and day by day ; 

I believe in Love Eternal, 

Fixed in God's unchanoring: will, 
That, beneath tlie deep infernal. 

Hath a depth that's deeper still 
In its patience, its endurance 

To forbear and to retrieve, 
In the large and full assurance 

Of its triumph, — I believe. 

'' Good Words '' 



155 



A Purpose in Life. 

Live for something I be not idle ; 

Look about thee for employ ; 
Sit not down to useless dreaming, — 

Labor is the sweetest joy. 
Folded hands are ever weary. 

Selfish hearts are never gay. 
Life for thee hath many duties : 

Active be, then, Avliile you may. 

Scatter blessings in your pathway, — 

Gentle words and cheering smiles : 
Better far than gold and silver 

Are their grief-dispelling Aviles. 
As the ijleasant sunshine falleth 

Ever on the grateful earth. 
So let sympathy and kindness 

Gladden well the darkened hearth. 

Hearts that are oppressed and weary. 

Drop the tear of sympathy ; 
Whisper words of hope and comfort ; 

Give, and thy reward shall be 
Joy unto thy soul returning 

From this j^erfect fountain-head. 
Freely, as thou freely givest. 

Shall the grateful light be shed. 

Anon. 



G9 



U-±t,iljililN V li-iJUI 




ITow shall come thy kingdom holy, 

111 which all the earth is blest, 
Tliat shall lift on high the lowly, 

And to weary souls give rest ? 
Not with trumpet call of legions 

Bursting through the ujDj^er sky, 
Waking earth through all its regions 

With their heaven-descending cry : 

Xot with dash or sudden sally, 

Swooping down with rushing wing ; 
But as, creei^ing up a valley, 

Come the grasses in the S2^i*ing : 
First one blade and then another, 

Still advancing are they seen, 
Rank on rank, each by its brother, 

Till each inch of ground is green. 

Tlirough the weary days of sowing, 

Burning sun, and drenching shower, 
Day by day, so slowly growing. 

Comes the waited harvest hour. 
So tlie kingdom cometh ever, 

Tliough it seem so far away; 
Each bright thouglit and true endeavor 

Hastens on the blessed day. 

]M. J. s. 



Surrounding the Mercy Seat 



Far from mortal cares retreating. 

Sordid hopes and fond desires, 
Here, our willing footsteps meeting, 

Every heart to heaven asj^ires. 
From the fount of glory beaming. 

Light celestial cheers our eyes, 
Mercy from above proclaiming 

Peace and pardon from the skies. 

Who may share this great salvation 

Every pure and humble mind; 
Every kindred, tongue, and nation 

From the dross of guilt refined. 
Blessings all around bestowing, 

God withholds his care from none; 
Grace and mercy ever flowing 

From the fountain of his throne. 

Every stain of guilt abhorring. 

Firm and bold in virtue's cause ; 
Still thy providence adoring, 

Faithful subjects to thy laws, — 
Lord, with favor still attend us. 

Bless us with thy wondrous love ; 
Thou, our sun and shield, defend us! 

All our hope is from above. 

J, Taylor 



70 



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158 



" TAe Zorc? z's im A/s //o/y Temple " 



159 



Battle 



God is in his holy temple ; 

Earthly thoughts, be silent now, 
While Avith reverence we assemble 

And before his presence bow. 
He is with us now and ever. 

When we call upon his name, 
Aiding every good endeavor, 

Guiding every upward aim. 

God is in his holy temple, — 

In the pure and holy mind. 
In the reverent heart and simple, 

In the soul from sense refined. 
Then, let every low emotion 

Banished far and silent be. 
And our souls in pure devotion. 

Lord, be temples worthy thee ! 



Dost thou hear the bugle sounding, 

Calling thee to take the field ? 
'Tis a battle all are waging : 

Thou must fight or thou must yield. 
'Tis the battle of the ages : 

No man may the gage refuse. 
Fight on one side or the other, 

Xo man can decline to choose. 

If from off the field thou fliest. 

Even thus thou art a foe : 
Who for truth no sword uplift etli 

He for error strikes a blow. 
He who bravely fights must conquer; 

l^one can e'er defeated be ; 
For, to soldiers in God's battles. 

Death itself is victory. 

M. J. s. 



MEADVILLE 6s 



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Love 



O Lo7E, with thy sweet chains 
Bind both my hand and heart ! 
Who knoweth not thy bonds 
In freedom hath no jDart. 

'Tis such a bond that holds 
Each in its circling round 
The suns and golden stars. 
Without a jar or sound. 

So bind the race of men 
In harmony and love, 
Till each his orbit fills 
Like those that shine above. 

Loving our brother thus, 
O Father, it shall be 
Our love shall higher reach. 
And end in loving thee. 



M. J. s. 



lOI The Father of All 

Upon one land alone 
Has shone the holy light. 
And all the world beside 
Been left to walk in night ? 

Are only Christian men 
The children of the Lord, 
And have none others heard 
The true, life-giving word ? 

Is there one only name 
In all the tribes of earth, 
Through which the longing soul 
May find its higher birth ? 

Nay, every land is thine ; 

All men thy children be ; 

And every name of truth 

A star that leads to thee. 

M. J. s. 



72 



WORK, FOR THE NIGHT IS COMING 7s & 6s Double 



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162 



Work, for the night is coming ; 

Work through the morning hours ; 
Work while the dew is sparkling ; 

Work 'mid springing flowers ; 
Work when the day grows brighter ; 

Work in the glowing sun ; 
Work, for the night is coming. 

When man's work is done. 

Work, for the night is coming ; 

Work through the sunny noon; 
Fill brightest hours with labor. 

Rest comes sure and soon. 



Give every flying minute 
Something to keep in store ; 

Work, for the night is coming, 
When man Avorks no more. 



Work, for the night is coming, 

Under the sunset skies ; 
While their bright tints are glowing. 

Work, for daylight flics. 
Work till the last beam fadetli, 
■ Fadeth to shine no more ; 
j Work wliile the niglit is darkening, 
I When man's work is o\*r. 
73 



MISSIONARY HYMN Ts & 63 



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When, on some strain of music, 

Our thoughts are wafted high ; 
When, touched with tender j^ity, 

Kind tear-drops dim the eye ; 
When thrilled by scenes of grandeur 

Or moved to deeds of love, 
Do we not give thee worship, 

O God in heaven above? 



For thou art all life's beauty, 

And thou art all its good ; 
By thy tides are we lifted 

To every lofty mood. 
Whatever good is in us. 

Whatever good we see, 
And every high endeavor, 

Are they not all for thee? 



Be it the organ's pealing, 
Be it some mountain high, 

Be it the swell of ocean, 
Or calm of star-lit sky ; 



Be it the grace of childhood 
Or look of human love, 

All love of good is worship 
That lifts toward God above. 



M. J. s. 



164 



Light for All 



74 



The light pours down from heaven, 

And enters where it may ; 
The eyes of all earth's chiklren 

Are cheered with one bright day. 
So let the mind's true sunshine 

Be spread o'er earth as free. 
And fill men's waiting spirits 

As the waters fill the sea. 

Then, let each human spirit 

Enjoy the vision briglit : 
The Truth which comes from heaven 

Shall spread like heaven's own light, 
Till earth becomes God's temple, 

And every human heart 
Shall join in one great service, 

Each happy in his part. 

Anon 



i65 



■ Consider the Lilies ' 



!i66 



He hides within the lily 

A strong and tender Care, 
That wins the earth-born atoms 

To glory of the air ; 
He weaves the shining garments 

Unceasingly and still, 
Along the quiet waters, 

In niches of the hill. 

We linger at the vigil 

With him who bent the knee 
To watch the old-time lilies 

In distant Galilee ; 
And still the worshi]) deepens 

And quickens into new. 
As, brightening down the ages, 

God's secret thrilleth through. 

O Toiler of the lily, 

Thy touch is in the man ! 
Xo leaf that dawns to petal 

But hints the angel-plan : 
The flower-horizons open. 

The blossom vaster shows, 
We hear thy wide worlds echo, — 

"See how the lily grows!" 

Shy yearnings of the savage 

Unfolding, thought by thought, 
To holy lives are lifted. 

To visions fair are wrought : 
The races rise and cluster. 

And evils fade and fall. 
Till chaos blooms to beauty. 

Thy purpose crowning all ! 

W. C. Gannett 



The shadows fall so gently 
Adown the evening sky, 

And, one by one, so softly 
The stars look out on high I 

With quiet benediction. 

That whispers, "All is best," 

The sky, like loving mother. 
The tired earth soothes to rest. 

And, through this outward quiet, 
There comes an inward calm 

That to the soul's distraction 
Applies its healing balm. 

The weary heart looks upward. 
And sees God's stars at rest, 

And hears his gentle Avhisper 
Down falling, "All is best." 



M. J. s. 



167 



Good-night 



GooD-xiGHT, we say at parting, — 
A night of rest and peace, 

A night that from day's labor 
Brinsrs all a sweet release. 

o 

And when earth's night of shadow 

For us has passed away. 
May each, in heaven's long morning, 

Greet all with glad Good-day ! 

M. J. s. 



75 



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i68 



Dedication of a Church 



O God, the stars of splendor 

Are thine eternal throne ; 
What to thee can we render 

That is not now thine own? 
The earth, with all its wonder 

Of stone and wood and gem, 
All things the wide sky under, — 

Thou hast created them. 

Behold what we have builded, 

A temple to thy praise ! 
But 'tis thy wealth has gilded 

The walls thy power did raise. 
Thine are its strength and beauty ; 

For in thy might it stands 
To speak of love and duty. 

Pure hearts and helping hands. 

How shall we consecrate it, 

And make it truly thine, 
That naught may separate it 

From all that is divine ? 
By seeking here forever 

To find thy truth ; and tlien. 
By one life-long endeavor. 

To help our fellow-men. 

]sr. J. s. 



169 



One Fold and One Shepherd 



Now IS the time approaching, 

By prophets long foretold, 
When all shall dwell together. 

One Shepherd and one fold. 
Now, Jew and Gentile, meeting 

From many a distant shore, 
Around one altar kneeling, 

One common Lord adore. 

Let all that now divides us 

Remove and pass away. 
Like shadows of the morning 

Before the blaze of day. 
Let all that now unites us 

More sweet and lasting prove, 
A closer bond of union 

In a blest land of love. 

O long-expected dawning, 

Come with thy cheering ray : 
Then shall the morning brighten. 

The shadows flee away ! 
O sweet anticipation! 

It cheers the watchers on 
To pray and hope and labor 

Till the dark niglit be gone. 

Jane Dorthwick 



76 



170 



Safety in God 



God is my strong salvation ; 

What foe have I to fear ? 
Ill darkness and temptation, 

My Light, my Help is near. 
Though hosts encamp around me, 

Firm in the fight I stand; 
What terror can confound me 

With God at my right hand? 

Place on the Lord reliance ; 

My soul, with courage wait : 
His truth be thine affiance 

When faint and desolate. 
His might thy heart shall strengthen, 

His love thy joy increase ; 
Mercy thy days shall lengthen, — 

The Lord will give thee j^eace. 

Montgomery 



171 



To Truth 



STAR of Truth, down shining 
Through clouds of doubt and fear, 

1 ask but 'neath your guidance 

My pathway may appear. 
However long the journey. 

How hard soe'er it be. 
Though I be lone and weary. 

Lead on, I'll follow thee I 

I know thy blessed radiance 

Can never lead astray. 
However ancient custom 

May tread some other way. 
K'^en if through untrod deserts. 

Or over trackless sea. 
Though I be lone and weary. 

Lead on, FU follow thee ! 



The bleeding feet of martyrs 

Thy toilsome road have trod ; 
But fires of human passion 

May light the way to God. 
Then, though my feet should falter, 

While I thy beams can see. 
Though I be lone and weary, 

Lead on, I'll follow thee ! 

Though loving friends forsake me. 

Or plead with me in tears; 
Though angry foes may threaten. 

To shake my soul with fears; 
Still to my high allegiance 

I must not faithless be : 
Through life or death, forever 

Lead on, I'll follow thee ! 

M. J. S. 



172 



Trust and Wait 



Misfortune's hand hangs o'er me. 
My load of grief is great ; 

The path is rough before me, — 
Be patient, trust and wait. 

The night is dark above me, 

Dawn breaks not, though 'tis late ; 

No heart awakes to love me, — 
Be patient, trust and wait. 

Whatever ill betide thee. 

Though hopeless seem thy fate, 

In high faith still abide thee, — 
Be patient, trust and wait. 

What though the clouds be o'er thee, 
Nor storms their force abate ? 

His love still goes before thee, — 
Be patient, trust and wait. 

M. J. S. 



77 



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173 



KisBy my Soul 



Rise, my soul, and stretch thy wings, 

Thy better portion trace ; 
Rise from transitory things 

Toward heaven, thy native j^lace. 
Sun and moon and stars decay. 

Time shall soon this earth remove : 
Rise, my soul, and haste away 

To seats prepared above. 

Rivers to the ocean run. 

Nor stay in all their course ; 
Fire ascending seeks the sun, — 

Both speed them to their source : 
So a soul that's born of God 

Pants to view his glorious face. 
Upward tends to his abode. 

To rest in his embrace. 

Rippon's Coll. 



174 



Quiet Religion 



Open, Lord, my inward ear, 

And bid my heart rejoice ; 
Bid my quiet spirit hear 

The comfort of thy voice. 
Never in the whirlwind found, 

Or w^iere earthquakes rock the place. 
Still and silent is the sound. 

The w^hisper of thy grace. 

From the world of sin and noise 

And hurry I withdraw ; 
For the small and inward voice 

I wait with humble awe : 
Silent I am now and still. 

Dare not in thy presence move ; 
To my waiting soul reveal 

The secret of thy love. 

Charles Wesley 



78 



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175 



Jerusalem the Golden 



Jerusalem the golden, 

With milk and honey blest ! 
Beneath thy contemplation 

Sink heart and voice opprest. 
I know not, oh, I know not 

What joys await us there, 
What radiancy of glory. 

What bliss beyond compare ! 

They stand, those halls of Zion, 

All jubilant with song. 
And bright with many an angel 

And all the martyr throng. 
There is the throne of glory ; 

And there, from care released, 
The shout of them that triumph, 

The song of them that feast. 

And they who, strong and faithful, 

Have conquered in the fight. 
Forever and forever 

Are clad in robes of white. 
O land that sees no sorrow ! 

O state that fears no strife ! 
O royal land of flowers ! 

O realm and home of life ! 

Bernard of Cluny. 
Tr. John Mason Neale 



176 



Ever with Me 



79 



Thou'rt with me, O my Father, 

At early dawn of day : 
It is thy glory brighteneth 

The upward streaming ray. 
It calls me by its beauty 

To rise and worship thee : 
I feel thy glorious presence, 

Thy face I may not see. 

Thou'rt with me, O my Father, 

In changing scenes of life. 
In loneliness of spirit. 

In weariness of strife ; 
My sufferings, my comforts. 

Alternate at thy will : 
I trust thee, O my Father, — 

I trust thee, and am still. 

Thou'rt with me, O my Father, 

In evening's darkening gloom : 
When earth in night is shrouded, 

Thy presence Alls my room. 
The trembling stars bring tidhigs 

Of kindness from above : 
I love thee, O my Father, 

And feel that thou art love. 

Jane E up hernia Saxbi/ 



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jLif Nearer y my Gody to Thee 

Nearer, my God, to thee, 

Nearer to thee : 
Even though it be a cross 

That raiseth me, 
Still all my song shall be, 
II : Nearer, my God, to thee, :|| 

Nearer to thee. 



Though like a wanderer, 
Daylight all gone. 

Darkness be over me, 
My rest a stone. 

Yet in my dreams I'd be 
I : Nearer, my God, to thee, : || 
Nearer to thee. 

There let the way appear 
Steps up to heaven ; 

All that thou sendest me 
In mercy given ; 



80 



Angels to beckon me 
; Nearer, my God, to thee, :|| 
Nearer to thee. 



Then with my waking thoughts, 
Bright with thy praise, 

Out of my stony griefs 
Bethel I'll raise : 

So by my woes to be 
: Nearer, my God, to thee :|| 
Nearer to thee. 

Or if on joyful wing. 

Cleaving the sky, 
Sun, moon, and stars forgot. 

Upward I fly, — 
Still all my song shall be, 
: Nearer, my God, to thee, : || 
Nearer to thee. 

S. F. Adams 



AMERICA 



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178 



National Hymn 



My country, 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, — 

Of thee I sing : 
Land where my fathers died, 
Land of the pilgrim's pride. 
From every mountain side 

Let freedom rinc: ! 

My native country, thee, — 
Land of the noble free, — 

Thy name I love : 
I love thy rocks and rills. 
Thy woods and templed hills ; 
My heart with rapture thrills 

Like that above. 

Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song ! 
Let mortal tongues awake; 
Let all that breathe partake ; 
Let rocks their silence break, — 

Tlie sound prolong! 



Our fathers' God, to thee. 

Author of liberty, — 

To thee we sing : 

Long may our land be bright 

With freedom's holy light ; 

Protect us by thy might. 

Great God, our King ! 

S. F. Smith 



179 



' God save the State " 



81 



God bless our native land ! 
Firm may she ever stand 

Through storm and night ! 
When the wild tempests rave, 
JRuler of winds and Avave, 
Do thou our country save 

By thy great might. 

For her our prayer shall rise 

To God, above the skies ; 

On him we wait : 

Thou who art ever nigh, 

Guarding with watchful eye. 

To thee aloud we cry, 

God save the State ! 

J. S. D wight 



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Like travellers that stray 
Through countries far away, 

But long for home ; 
Like birds that seek their nest, 
Like child to mother's breast. 
Weary for peace and rest. 

To thee we come. 

From our too anxious thought. 
From all our hands have wrought. 

From truth's long quest ; 
From danger's wild alarms, 
From evil's fatal charms. 
To thine embracing arms. 

We fly for rest. 

As ships their anchors cast 
When all the storms are past, 

Their troubles o'er ; 
Whatever may betide. 
Here, sheltered by thy side. 
In safety we'll abide 

Forever more ! 

M. J. s. 



i8i 



Prayer 



Here on this little world. 

Through cloud and sunshine whirled 

Athwart the sky. 
We look out on the light. 
We look up through the night. 
And wonder if God's might 

May hear our cry. 

Is all a heartless void. 

Worlds made and worlds destroyed, 

With none to care? 
Or somewhere in the deep 
Is One who does not sleep. 
But wakes to watch and keep. 

And note our prayer ? 

We trust no joy or pain 

Is ever felt in vain, — 

That not one cry 

Dies on the empty air ; 

Ifo human heart's despair 

Shall miss the loving care 

That rules on high. 

M. J. s. 



82 



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Th e Ln dy ing Th ings 



Kind words can never die, 

Cherished and blest : 
God knows how deep they lie 

Stored in the breast. 
Like childhood's simple rhymes, 
Said o'er a thousand times, 
And in all years and climes. 

They cannot die. 

Sweet thoughts can never die. 

Though, like the Howers, 
Their brightest hues may fly 

In wintry hours; 
But, when the gentle dew 
Gives them their charms anew, 
With many an added hue 
They bloom again. 



Childhood can never die : 
Thoughts of the past 

Float in the memory, 
Bright to the last. 

Many a happy thing, 

Many a sunny spring. 

Come on time's ceaseless wini 
Back to the heart. 



The soul can never die. 

Though in the tomb 
Our mortal bodies lie, 

Wrapt in its gloom. 
What though the flesh decay ? 
The soul will pass away, 
And live in endless day 

With God above. 



83 



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I03 G^oc? our Shepherd I In the midst of affliction, my table is 

' sjDread ; 

The Lord is my Shepherd, no want shall ^^^^ blessino:s unmeasured my cup run- 

Iknow: I netho^r; 

I feed in green pastures, safe folded I ^.^|^ perfume and oil thou anointest 

^'^^^ ' my head : 

He leadeth my soul where the still Oh ! what shall I ask of thy providence 

waters flow, more ? 

Restores me when wandering, redeems 

when oppressed. 

' Let goodness and mercy, my bountiful 
Through the valley and shadow of (Jod 

death though I stray. Still follow my steps till I meet thee 

Since thou art my guardian, no evil I above : 

fear : I geek by the path which my forefathers 

Thy rod shall defend me, thy staff be trod 

my stay ; j Through the land of their sojourn, tliy 

No liarm can befall, with my comforter | kin«*dom of love. 

near. 1 Montgomery 

84 



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Father, in thy mysterious presence 
kneeling, | 

Fain would our souls feel all tliy | 
kindling love; [revealing I 

For we are weak, and need some deej^ 
Of trust and strength and calmness 
from above. 



lO K "Who hy searching can find out God" 

I CAXXOT find thee. Still on restless 
pinion 
My spirit beats the void where thou 
dost dwell ; 
I wander lost through all thy vast do- 
minion, 
And shrink beneath thy light ineffable. 



Lord, we have wandered forth through ; 
doubt and sorrow. 
And thou hast made each step an ; 
onward one ; [morrow, — 

And we will ever trust each unknown 
Thou wilt sustain us till its work is 
done. 



I cannot find thee. Even when, most 

adoring, [|>rayer, 

Before thy shrine I bend in lowliest 

Beyond these bounds of thought, my 

thought upsoaring 

From furthest quest comes back : 

thou art not there. 



In the heart's depths, a peace serene and ' Yet high above the limits of my seeing, 

. hc>ly An^ folded far Avithin the inmost 

Abides ; and when pain seems to have : heart, [being, 

its will, [slowly, ; And deep below the deeps of conscious 

Or Ave despair, oh, may that peace rise 1 Thy splendor shineth : there, O God, 

Stronger than agony, and we be still ! ! thou art. 

Now, Father, now, in thy dear presence i cannot lose thee. Still in thee abiding, 

kneeling, [love;. The end is clear, how Avide soe'er I 

Our spirits yearn to feel thy kindling | j-oam ; [is guiding, 

XoAvmake us strong: we need thy deep The laAV that holds the Avorlds my steps 

revealing [from above. And I must rest at last in tliee, my 

Of trust and strength and calmness home. 

S. Johnson Eliza Scudder 



i86 



Maestoso, 



SENTENCE. 

BASS SOLO AND QUARTET 



HOWARD M. DOW, 



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A'ords by M. J. SAVAGE 
Allegretto, 



THE VOICE OF THE PAST. 



__K. • , N fy 1- 



Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 



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We are athletes in th' arena : 

Round us rising, tier on tier, 
Shadowy legions of the Fathers, 

'^Clouds of Avitnesses," appear. 
And they cheer the vigorous onset 

With a proud and glad acclaim, 
But for him who shirks his duty 

Tears have they of wrath and shame. 

Listen ! for the deathless voices 

Of that Century-distant day 
Shape themselves to one clear echo, 

Ringing out above the fray, — 
''Sons, be w^orthy of the Fathers ! 

They w^ere men who dared to stake 
Life and fortune and fair honor 

For their periled freedom's sake. 



"Dare be loyal unto duty ; 

Barter not your soul for gain ; 
Trade not principle for party ; 

Seek the highest truth t' attain. 
While to truth you are but faithful 

Shun not e'en alone to stand ; 
One, with God, shall still be victor, 

And th' Omnipotent command. 

'''Wlien you've fought the human battle. 

Given to every one his right, — 
There shall come an end of struggle. 

And the darkness shall be light. 
Clang of arms, and strife of brothers, 

And the flow of blood shall cease ; 
Swords be beaten into plow-shares. 

And the weary earth have peace." 



i88 




EASTER SONQ. 

SOLO & QUAKTET. 
(By permission of White, Smith & Co.) 
Written by M. J. SAVAGE. Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 

Allegretto, 






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crouched in caves and shadows, trembling praying for the hght: And they shouted in their gladness when the 




EASTER SONG. 



f ^ 



A A A A 



mf 



Sun rose warm and bright, And day came marching on I In the long and dreary winters when the 

L 



* 



=^^^=^ 



V 



i=p 



=?E^E±=5: 






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■^z. 



2^61= 



d~=. ^ 



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^^;^^BEi 



-#—*"=—# • - 



?/?/ 



uteiHi 



A A A A 



:^:^-fi= 



~^. — ^ 



Sva.. 



Fed, 






earth was cold and dead, When the ice was in the valleys, and the wild sky overhead. How the 

^ 






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ra#- 



3-^^"E 



5^=P^=«-" 



:t=: 



i 



/= 



Quartet 1st verse. 



i^feg£iii 



-^— P 



-#— r-#- 



zMzr^vi, 



-*— a 






freezing people shouted when the cru - el winter fled, And Spring came marching on I 






S 



1 ^ ^ 



-^#— =~ 



-^0-^ 






-# — >.- 



L^#— !_ 



idz: 



<^ra.. 



=i 



[i 



89 



pi! 



QUARTETTE, 

J Soprano. 



EASTER SONG. 



Sz^: 



?;::*= 



1. Hail with Joy tlie blessed Spring-time ! Hail with Joy the blessed Spring-time ! 

fAlto. A 



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:!#-- 



:^= 



^^. 



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S^^ 



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2. Hope shall triumph o - ver douht-ing ! Hope shall triumph o - ver doubt - ing ! 

J Tenor, A 



t-- 



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=3»: 



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-k 



3. Day shall reign o'er night forev 

f Bass, A 



- er I Life shall conquer death forev - er I 



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4EE 



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— i^ 1 1 



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A A 



.^i_-?-_ 



^ '.^i 



ifi»- 




90 



EASTER SONG. 



i 



Tenor Solo. 



t=^=A: 



-^— * 



--!_»_ 



:ti 



2. Birth of day and birth of spring-time I Dawning light and opening flow'rs I Right 



^2- 1— ^ 1— I 1 ^ 1 -^ 1 ^ 1 ^— I j-v IS- «' ^— ^^J- 



ZMZLZ 






-'^#- 



-^#— ^ 



P6(i. 






well has mankind ^yo^shipped Easter, best of heavenly- Pow'rs! Of 



light and life the S5'mbol,vanqaished 



P5= 



ZZTff ^ , ^ ■ 1 i^_L i^ B^ s^-^ 1 — I^ZJ^q^Ii^ m^ p=^ ^^_i^_ 




death and happy hours, While Spring is marching on I So ^vhen their hearts ^Yere heavy with tiie 



r«— 



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p 



t--y,^.- 



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3=J^l=tfc 







Ped, 



91 



EASTER SONG. 




I'ts of death and doom, In that old wondrous story of the rock-he\vn,empty tomb, Men 






i 



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^— ^ 



M^nm-M—L 



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t* 



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/^ 



(Quartet 2nd verse.) 



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--t- 



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-iS'-v-i 



#— r-# 



:?:=:^=^=^: 



read the mighty triumph o-ver death of life and bloom, And hope went march-ing on ! 




i 



Soprano Solo. 



=5;=^ 



p 



?>-#- 



-•-— 



ili=t 



-t^ — j--^ 



3. Whether fact, or whether f ai - ry-tale, the hu- man heart that grieves O-ver 



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P 



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-f^0- 



-00- 



1)2 



EASTER SONG. 



•^-V-«— I i— # ^— -^- ^A '^— •-T'^ 




dear ones that departed with the f alMng of the leaves ; So long as love remaineth sweet,so 



m — \ — 1^ — |!--^F^^^— p-j — ■ — I — m, — \-^,— H — i? — I — ^=^—^—5 — ^— i— — 4 



m. 



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i=i= 



^9- 




^.- 






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SL 



long it still believes That life is marching on I 



So hail thee,blessed Easter I Sign of 




p 



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s;-i — =:;-i — 



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i±t 



ft—^—m-r^ 



mf 



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im-mor-tal - i - ty I Xight fears thee,winter flees thee, and death himself shall die, AVhile 






iS 



/ 






75#=?= 



93 



-^•" 
f*^- 



1 






EASTER SONG. 





J* 


^ 


(Quaiiet 3rd, verse,) 


f) ^ N N. fL — ■ ^ 




#5— ^ — $._.c^ — ^-^-H^ ^ . ^ 


— ^—^ ' f '^ ^ w, 1 


-^ ^ ^ ^^^^-^ 


irh — # — ^-•-r-*-^ ai-^,* — J- 


J \ y y 1 J 


"^ ^" 'f ~ T~^+l 


v^y • • J y 


•^ ! , ^ rS / 


1 ' I 1 - II 


light,an(ilife,an(ihappi-ness, shall follow thee on high, As 


thou 

r^- 


art march-ing on ! 




r- -1 "l' ■ -"l' -^ ^- 


-T J- "^-j 


;Jf-^— 1— 1— 1 T-i^l'-i-^- 


— ^ \^m ^Pl3 *1 > 


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is 


rn m ■ ^ m \ m ' «' ' ^ 


■ 1 • J^^ • W^f ^ 











* 2 is 


ci -J- . ^ -J- . ^ -J- . ^ -J- . * • • ^- • ' ^1 


1 


si/ 


1 4 1 "! [ ^ i 4 r j"T ■ > 


:>=:=»>-, 


Z;*^*^ i i '^ • ': 1 W • 1 


1 # • 


! - 1 1 


' II 


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' « J N ^ ^ 


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• J ! 


^ -11 


1 (^m—^ ^#-- 


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8va.. 
Fed, 



189 



CHEISTMAS CAROL. 



Words by M. J. SAVAGE. 

Allegretto. 






zSEB: 



I/' 



•^s . 



e^e 



^SE 



-#~— 



?=H 



Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 






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:t=t 



iMiz^i 



i 



t^: 



SOLO. 



'i=r 



Itl 



n 



-h- 



1. In the old time, runs the sto - ry, There was once . . a won-drous 

2. Since that day the chil - dren's voi - ces Have caught up . . the glad re - 

3. Each new child's a new Mes - si -ah, Wheth - er cot. . or pal- ace 




^•s^^^-*^ 



:=:*z: 



94 



CHRISTMAS CAROL 



jsg 



^-^ 



night, When from out the 
frain ; And to - night the 



un - seen glo - ry Burst a song of glad de - 
heart re - joic - es That the liour conies round a 



born, Lead-ing on the race still high -er Toward the glad redemp-tion 




i 



fcfc 



^ 



±±^= 



-•-4- 



"TTL 



light : It was when the stars were gleaming.Shepherds watched their flocks, and 

gain ; And the chil - dren are our an-gels ; AVitli one loud acclaim they 

morn ; Each new child's a word new spoken, God to earth come down a- 




'±±. 



=P-q-^— ^ 



m 



-#-^- 



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then In tlieir wak-ing or their dreaming, Angels sang, * 'Good-will to men." I 
cry, Answ'ring back the glad e- van-gel's ''Glory be to God on high." I 
gain With his prom-ise nev-er bro- ken, "Peace on earth, good- will to men." I 




-#-r#- 



I ^^: :j: • :j: 






rzzdi 



95 



CHRISTMAS CAROL. 



CHOJt VS. 

Soprctno, 



ESS 



-#— ^- 



:i^=:^"*==^ 



-*_-d=jt 






:rj3pzLp=F=:^- 



Mer - ry Christmas ! Mer-ry Christmas ! Let us make the heavens ring ! Ech-o 

Contralto* 







Mer - ry Christmas I Mer-ry Christmas ! Let us make the heavens ring ! Ech-o 
Uass, 



:fc|ipr=p: 



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ipzt^i 



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Era; 



1 



H—i-M 



H^^^H — N- 



J^- 



-M-zizMzztjL 



i— •- 



lS^E5 



/ 



-•-I-*— r-# — •-•-• 



^. -j^. 



J •^/^5-g5=5=Si 



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i 



i 



fcs 



i 



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back the an - gel's mes-sage, With the songs the chil-dren sing ! 



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di 



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± 



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ff*- 



i 



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;?iEt 



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t=F= 



i 



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back the an - gel's mes - sage, With the songs the chil - dren sing! 



i 



Bv^^c*= 



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:^= 



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r=ft: 






1 



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ij 



9G 



igo 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



Words by M. J. SAVAGE. 



Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 



B ^ COliXlJT 

Andantino. 








Andantino. 



-0-0-0'e-a-9/-»-0-tf- -0-0-0-0-0-0-^ T f -0-0-0-4-0-0-0-0-0- -55^-5##-# 



_ m-0- 
0^-0 



P 



Choir Org. Flute and Didciana. 



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e 



-X 



-^ — ^ 



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mi 



^^=3F 



Fed, Org.' 




tJ 1 



Mzt:4zUz4zMZ0zMz 



-0-0-m-0-m-m-0-0- -0-0 _, _, _ _, . , . 
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0- 0-0-0-0-0-0-0-00 






^^^f- r^ 



f 



^E?E 



1 ^ ^ 



-^-#- 



-tS'-r — 



I Solo may be played either by Cornet or Swell Trumpet as desired. 

97 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



^g^^^ 



qt — ptJ^n^ 



-n^ 



0^- 



W- 



iiz^T=i^^. 






E^ 



=^ A-i«— ^^-^ • 



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cres - - cen 



-[- 



-^^ 



tr- 



3Fi«^^ 



H-Hii !- 







c?'e5 - - cen 



i 



=P* 



5-#- 



-^_A — ft. 



ft_^^_ 



-^ — ^ 






-^ ^- 



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cZo. 



S 
iJ 



f 



:^==^: 



-J~r--0- 



jLjzzzmL 



=1=I^= 






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_^ ^ 



-^ ^t^ 



7f t \'9 — n — I — \ — I — I — I I I — f — I — \ — I — ^ I i~~i I 1-4--^ i I — ^-^n — p^4— f^^— ^^~i^ '9~w' 



do. 



f 



- — i j p\ 






-#-T- 



- g^-T- 



98 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



bi^ 



^^-r^f^— f»- 



ritard. 



ritard. 



dimiiu 



3^ 



^^^ 



- g?- 



^^1 




^ — ' t ill 



-i — \ — \ 1- 



I ^ 



nfard -0-0-0-^ ^* 0-00-0-0-0-0-0-0 -0- -#- 



SJ=i±G g 



^= 



-25^ 



-^-=1- 



i 



i 



Comet ohligato* 

Andantino, ;§; ^ 



S3 



g-^- 



-=^^ — =^ 



^--# — r 



Q ^ 

m 



Soprano Solo, 'S- ^^v 



-Pi-^ 



^g-^ — =^-^ 



-# \-0- 



±ht 



_^ 



1. Born at last I the gi'eat Messi - ah Bringethin thebet-ter 

3. The op - press - or rides in tri - umph, And the weak are in the 




-^-m-mm^m-mm-m- -000-000 m0g»m0- 
-0-0-0^-0-0^- -0p^-0 0- 



m 



W=i- 



Mz 



-=i-« — =^ 



-p#- 



-^1-1— 1 S 1 -# 



Manuals. Peel, ad lib. 



99 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



/ 



-f — ir 




/ 



=^= 



Zfdw. 



■r^—\ — ^-\ — 



£3SEE=?|.' 



ePe^eB 



day. Peace on earth, good will from heaven, Lo ! the star 

dust. Shall the e - - vil always prosper ? Is it vain 



that leads the 
the hope we 







f=^=t=^ 



-f^- 



:jvt± 



-J"- 



a tem2')o. 



SiEifi 



=is= 



it 



3t 



a temj^o. 



^ 



?j: 



-f— b^ 



?^ 



-P=n- 



-# — 0- 



JB^ZfZ 



=P=~P- 



I 



;p=EP=£ 



way ! So runs on the ancient sto - ry 

trust ? Peace comes not, but ev - er strug - gle, 



a temjyo, 



-U-*W= 



Of the shepherds, that strange 
Man his broth - er fighteth 




^: — ^^^ — \^ — N 



w^m 



— \-0- 



^=tt:: 



100 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 




?^i='^ 



■w- 



-^-0- 



-y^-i^ 



3P= 



I 



m 



f 



-»0^i' 



-•— I— •- 



:tq:= 



night, 
still, 



How they heard 
In the yet 



thequir-ing an - - gels, And be- 
far dis - tant f u - - ture Lies the 



ivviv^^^rt^^ff^^ 



f 



\ I T?T?T^J=rl 



^9 — •- 



It at 



:±fc 



$ 



ritard. ff colla voce, 



-•-"^^r 



_^_^ 



-^-j— 



^ 



Hard. 



-#—=-- 



J.U 



3SLi 



-^--- 



il^ 



held the wondrous light, 
bright land of good will, 



And be-held the won-drous 
Lies the bright land of good 



light, 
will. 



— \ — I — I — \ — I — i-p-^- 



-H-l *^^ ^^^ ^ h^ \ 1 |"P"^— ■■■■— 

• TfT??^ ?Tf -0-0-0-0-0-0 -m0m0^ 



«?•?•?• 



ritard. colla voce. 

> //< : 



^ 



QXTABTET, 

Soprano, 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



^^ 




5i3!'=i: 



--^—^z 



Alto, ^^ 

2. But the wea 
AQTenor, ^^^ 



JLZ^^^ 



litEtrizEitgzf 



ry world still waiteth, And the prom - ise long de - lays ; Still the 

1 I ^ _ 



-•- -#- -#- 



-•- -•- 



-•- -•- • -#- 






^^ 



ffe^ 



i:rt± 



^=f?^ 



Bass, 



Organ, ad lib. 




^-=^^^; 



iz=p=Etz:lEi=^Es3EEj^=:J^ii^^Eazz3E^=:l 



33^iS 



;^*-T 




If ^ — ^ i " • " • "-^ ■■ I ~ Lj ■ I t/ 

hope - star lead - eth on - ward O - ver dark and di;«i - ry ways. Oft the 

L 






A^ 



pi 



^5t 







mmmm 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 




P 



#--^- 



^con duolo. 






star 



_^_^_f_ 



it-self shines dimh% From a sky, that clouds obscure : And the heavens lose their 



i 



-f-1- 



H — N-1-^- 



-•ii~ii: 






4-.^i_- 



P 



-*-^- 



3=E 



^^^tt^t^fji 



r-i^=^^--- 






?-•- 



H-# 1-#- 






liitt 



:*i^^ir 



Z *-^-*—^ zmi 



-J-l^ 



#^-# ^ • # 



IMZliiL- 



^»^H^ 






T=^^ 



■#^#J 



ttiZI^lE'l 



^..^ 



P 



con duolo. 



-F# — r 



-#-•- 



jtziMz 



^ li 



^JL_«_ 



€--€- 



^ii?=S 












^ 



ES^zF^ 



pi - - 



ty For the cry 






ritard. 



•8: 



JtzSzyi 



:iizzz«=E 



ing of the poor, For the crying of the poor. 
— ^^ P ritard. 



=P=P= 



i^zpi 






f=f 



ItZjt 






:S; 



^ 



I 
ritard. 















:2=^= 



ztziUz 



4 K-1 1 ^ U - :^ ■- 



I :S: 



103 



Soj)rano solo D. .S. 
(3d Verse.) 



^ 

m 



% 



TUTTI. 

Cornet. 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



mf 



Nf— -^ 



'^. 



■#--- 



0-^- 



-=1— ^- 



E^EfE^ 



^^ 



s 



fcs= 



Soprano, Alto, and Tenor in unison, 

NB. The Altos to sing one octave bel ow. 



W 



-=*-s- 



^ 



P=^tf 



ntfj: 



mf 

4. But though long 



de-lay ed, it com - etii. Heav'n is 




104 



CHRISTMAS SONG. 



ritard. 



a temjio. 




105 




CHRISTMAS SONG. 



§! 



=^S=^ 



do. 



1^=^ 



plan. 



g 



-h- 



it± 



Haik I the far 



- off f u - tiire shout - eth "Peace on 



1^ 



/ 



do. 




^=ij»=». 






-^»— » — »— P- 






-0-0-0-0-0 






r-St 



■rrrr 



-H-H-*-i- 



/ 



J'A 



\cres 



do. 



-At- 



-##- 



-=1-#- 



-=1-#- 



— -V- — =^f- 



ffritard. ^ 




earth, good will to man V 



*Teace on earth,goo(i will to man I" 



i \ ^Jt 



3=:^ 



~pr^ 



ill 



ff ritard. 







ff ritard. 

> ^ I I. U 



iifc 






106 



191 

Written by M. J. SAVAGE. 



CHRISTMAS HYMN. 

J- ^ 



Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 




1. Let the lieavens break forth in sing-ing I Stars,that saw the bright earth born, 

2. Earth, so long the home of sor-row, Sweeping on thro' clouds and night, 









±At 



J± 



I ^1 



:i=s 



■?H>- 



«J 



=S=8=^- 






^-^rX 



;*=* 



-jtzut 



:=t 



-H #- 



fej 



Her 
Hail 



aid forth the sun that's bringing To the world its glad-dest morn I 
with loud ac - claim the morrow I For it brings a "fair-er light. 



mziz 



^^=f^ 



m=mm^ mmm=m 



1^ I 



A-^ 



H- 



liizr 



5=^ST 



Heav'n-ly glo - ry, heav'n- 1 y l)eau- ty, Crown the earth this Christmas morn. 
Bright the present, bright the f ut - ure Glow beneath this Christmas morn. 



ga 



^-Tt"^ 



iziz 



=P=p: 



i 



I 



iizBztzizzizfSilTi 



3 Angels that excel in glory, 

Elder brothers of the sky, 
Help us sing the lofty story 

Of divine humanity. 
"God is with us, God is with us," 

Speaks this blessed Christmas morn. 



m 



4 Heaven and earth, and men and Angels, 
Lift one voice in glad acclaim, 

And on high o'er all Evangels, 
Shout aloud the Christmas name I 

Earth and Heaven, Earth and Heaven, 
Are at one this Christmas morn. 



192 



CHRISTMAS CAROL. 



Words by M. J. SAVAGE. 
P Solo 




Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 



-N- 



■^- 



ji- 

1. O shep-herds, shepherds, did you hear From out 

2. O chil - dren, we can nev-er tell AVere w^e 
3.0 shep-herds! chil-dren! in your souls, If you 

Allegretto modei^ato. 



m 



the night-sky ring - ing, Be- 
a-wake or dreaming; 'Jliere 
will on - ly hear it, Tiie 



CHRISTMAS CAROL. 




neath 
was 
an 



the stars, or far, or near, The sound of voi - ces sing - ing ? And 
on ns a ho - ly spell, Our hearts from fear re-deem - ing. But 
gel's song for- ev - er rolls. The mu '' " 



sic of yourspir - it. Care 




:^ 



-{$'— r 



-A-^- 



s 



did 

wheth 

not 



:^=t 



you see the an - gels nigh, Or just 
er in our heai'ts the song. Or in 



=JEi Fi=g= J 




:i 



as they were go - ing. Catch 
the air a -hove us. Its 



to hear with out-ward ear. Be false to du - ty nev - er ; The 



t^H 



E^ 



-* — ^ — ± 



^=^= 



i=g^ 



-t~ 



glimps - es of them in the sky, Them by their brightness know - ing ? 
ho - ly notes will ecli - o long, And teach that God doth love us. 
in - ward song you'll al-ways hear, "Good- will to men for-ev - er." 



± 



-m ^ — d- 



^j^ 






i^r^^i 



CHRISTMAS CAROL. 



^ 1. For could we once but see them near, Or know that they were by us, 

Contrftlto, 




i 



QVAJtTET. 

J Soprano » 



We 



^- 



er near, He is 



' 4 ^ 

for - ev - er by you ; Do 



Be sure 

/ Tenor, 



that God is ev 



=i= 



Do 



Yes ! be you sure He's ev - er near, God is 

Bass, ^ w , , 



for - ev - er by you ; 



m 



qrzzfE: 



-0 — 0- 




i 



1^—^ 



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then should nev-er know a fear, And sor - row,— it would fly 



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and nev - er know a fear, And 



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right— and you will know no fear. And sor 



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row,— it will fly 



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109 



193 



NATIONAL HYMN. 



Words by M. J. SAVAGE. 
Andante, 



Music by HOWARD M. DOW. 




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1. Our fa - thers' God, who still The chil -dren's God wilt be, With 

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lov - ing thank - ful - ness 



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The songs of praise our sires have sung Shall e - clio still up - on our tongue. 



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A hundred j' ears ago 

They saw in vision bright 
A nation that should know, 
And knowing, do the right ; 
Where all the people should be free 
To rule themselves and worship Thee. 



They spared nor blood nor tears 

To make the vision true. 
May we in coming years 
Their glorious work renew! 
And thus the dream shall grow to be 
A fair, world-wide reality. 



And when our hands have raised 

This temple of the free, 
In it Shalt Thou be praised, 
And Thine the glory be; 
For Thine the thought, and Thine the might 
That lift the ages into light. 
110 



194 



PRAYER FOR 




Words by M. J. SAVAGE. 

Adagio. 

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PEACE. 

Music adapted from MORNINGTON. 
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Lord, May Thy peace our long - 



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When the sun withdraws its light, 
And our day is quenched in night, 

Then, O Lord, 
May the stars of hope be bright. 



When on life's tempestuous sea, 
Our frail bark drifts hopelesslj', 

Then, O Lord, 
Wilt Thou our safe harbor be ? 



195 



THE AMERICAN SONG. 



Words by M. J. SAVAGE 

Allegro marziale. 



Music by V. CIRILLO. 



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111 



THE AMERICAN SONG. 
SOLO. 

Allegro marziale. 



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song shall A-nier - i - ca sing, 
dark low - lands of the past, 



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Young heir of the el - der 
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THE AMERICAN SONG. 




ban - ner de-feat ne'er furled? 
wound -ed free - dom dies. 



A song for the brave and the 
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hope for the day to be, The light of the com 

kings is mans des - pair And the hope of the world 



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THE AMERICAN SONG. 



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song for the brave and the 
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114 



THE AMERICAN SONG. 



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shout 
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of hope for the day to be, 
of kings is man's des - pair 



The light 
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3 'Tis the song of the free we sing ! 
Of a good time not yet born, 
Where each man of himself is King ; 
Of a day whose gladsome morn 
Shall see the earth l)eneath our feet 
And a fair sky overhead ; 
When those now sad shall find life sweet, 
And none shall hunger for bread. 
Cho.— Shall see the earth, etc. 



4 Sing then our American Song ! 
'Tis no boast of triumphs won 
At the price of another's wrong, 
Or of foul deeds foully done. 
We fight for the wide world's right, 
To enlarge life's scope and plan, 
To flood the earth with hope and light, 
To build the kingdom of man ! 
Clio.— We fight for the etc. 



115 



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